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Team spots clue to rare lung and kidney diseases

Pulmonary-renal syndrome (PRS) refers to a group of rare but potentially fatal conditions that nearly always are caused by a misguided attack by the body’s immune system on the lungs and kidneys. Coughing up blood and blood in the urine are telltale signs. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs can be effective if begun before

13 Ways to Turn Oatmeal Into a Luxurious Breakfast Treat

We don’t know about you, but we really love oatmeal. It makes for a cozy five-minute breakfast in winter months, and cold overnight oats are easy and refreshing in the summer (although, TBH, we mostly stick to hot oats all year). And we still can’t get over the fact that something so easy and inexpensive

Anxious people respond worst to bushfire threat

Research from The University of Western Australia has found people who are anxious or easily stressed are less likely to be well prepared or respond well to bushfires. It comes days after a new bushfire season campaign was launched by the State Government to raise awareness about the realities of catastrophic and severe fires. UWA

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 — Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), with the association significant for men only, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the British Journal of Cancer. Yanan Ma, from China Medical University in Shenyang, and colleagues followed 87,523 women from the

Dana-Farber to present research on myeloma progression from precursor conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists will present research marking significant advances against the hematologic cancer multiple myeloma at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4. Their findings provide new insights into the progression of the disease from precursor conditions and suggest approaches for novel treatments. In related work, Dana-Farber investigators will also present

6 Ways to Guarantee Your Kids Have Fun on Vacation

Vacations are supposed to be fun for the whole family, but parents and kids sometimes have different definitions of “fun.” Luckily, with a little bit of planning, you can make sure the whole gang has a blast on your getaway. From booking a stay at a resort that caters to kids to making some adjustments

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 — Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends. Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer appear to benefit from regular mammograms as much as women in their 40s

What You Can Do to Prevent Diabetes

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 — Type 2 diabetes has reached alarming numbers in the United States. But you can prevent or delay it through healthy eating and active living, an expert suggests. Diabetes affects more than 30 million Americans, and type 2 is the most common form. As many as one-third of Americans have prediabetes,

The Right Way to Save Oil After Frying a Turkey

Frying a turkey isn’t really the traditional method of cooking a Thanksgiving bird, but it does give it an awesome crispy skin and juiciness through the roof. Still, a lot of us seem to avoid the whole deep-frying situation because of the terrifying tales of Thanksgiving Day explosions — and the fact that the process requires

Why I’m Teaching My Kid Not to Celebrate Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, but I won’t be celebrating this year. And I’ll be teaching my toddler son exactly why I’m killing this holiday — in my heart at least. Because exactly what is there to celebrate again? I have always loved Thanksgiving. There’s something about a day filled with food without the pressure to

Medics suggest modifications to coronary artery stenting

Bifurcation lesions are a challenge, even for an experienced cardiac surgeon. Currently, there are two surgical techniques for dealing with them, but no medical consensus on which one applies to which case. Russian scientists have now successfully tested a new surgical technique involving stents and drug-eluting balloon catheters on 128 patients. “We decided to study

Scientists trained a computer to classify breast cancer tumors

Using technology similar to the type that powers facial and speech recognition on a smartphone, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have trained a computer to analyze breast cancer images and then classify the tumors with high accuracy. In a study published in the journal NPJ Breast Cancer, researchers reported