Tag: to

Try Small ‘Bites’ to Get Kids to Exercise

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 — Kids take their cues from mom and dad, so it only makes sense to participate with them when teaching them the merits of exercise. Couch potato kids are a real concern. The College of New Jersey exercise science professor Avery Faigenbaum defined the term exercise-deficit disorder — or EDD —

New way to prevent heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Scientists reveal the mechanism which allows a commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes to prevent heart disease in patients with type 1 diabetes–and could lead to new treatments. Metformin is an inexpensive treatment that is often used for type 2 diabetes to lower blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. The

Treatment tied to survival benefit in complex bladder cancer

(HealthDay)—Cancer treatment is associated with a clinically meaningful survival benefit in older, medically complex patients with superficial bladder cancer (SBC), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Cancer. Tullika Garg, M.D., M.P.H., from Geisinger in Danville, Pa., and colleagues evaluated the association between treatment of SBC and 10-year mortality in 1,800 medically complex

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer’s journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn’t seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true

2006 to 2015 saw decrease in Medicare beneficiary ICU use

(HealthDay)—From 2006 to 2015, there was a significant decrease in intensive care unit (ICU) admissions among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, according to a research letter published online Oct. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Gary E. Weissman, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues used data from the Medicare Provider Analysis and

New way to determine whether metastatic cancer cells in breast cancer patients are dormant or soon to turn deadly

For the first time ever, Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein as a marker that can indicate whether a cancer patient will develop a reoccurrence of lethal, metastatic cancer, according to a clinical study published in Breast Cancer Research in October. The researchers found that when cells from a breast cancer patient’s original tumor

Two seemingly opposing forces in the brain actually cooperate to enhance memory formation

The brain allows organisms to learn and adapt to their surroundings. It does this by literally changing the connections, or synapses, between neurons, strengthening meaningful patterns of neural activity in order to store information. The existence of this process—brain plasticity—has been known for some time. But actually, there are two different types of brain plasticity

How to avoid raising a materialistic child

If you’re a parent, you may be concerned that materialism among children has been on the rise. According to research, materialism has been linked to a variety of mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression, as well as selfish attitudes and behaviors. But there’s some good news. A new University of Illinois at Chicago

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by

Canadian smokers support bold new approaches to end tobacco use

Most Canadian smokers are in favour of novel policies to reduce tobacco use, according to a national survey by the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC) at the University of Waterloo. Responding to the Canadian government’s commitment to reduce tobacco use to less than five per cent of the population by 2035, the ITC