Category: Health News

New carbon-dioxide-adsorbing crystals could form the basis of future biomedical materials that rely on the shape-memory effect

Kyoto University scientists are one step closer to designing porous materials that can change and retain their shapes — a function known as shape-memory effect. Shape-memory materials have applications in many fields. For example, they could be implanted in the body and then induced to change shape for a specific function, such as serving as

The role of health in climate lawsuits

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) are at the forefront of analyzing how climate lawsuits shape the nation’s response to climate change. A new analysis investigates the role of health concerns in climate litigation since 1990 and finds that although health is cited in a minority of cases, it may have critical potential for

Drug effectiveness in reducing glucocorticoid-induced bone loss: The drug denosumab was superior to a commonly used drug in a 12-month study enrolling 795 patients

About one in every 100 people in the world takes glucocorticoids long term to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, have a side effect — they induce the bone loss called osteoporosis, causing an estimated yearly bone fracture rate of 5 percent. An alternative treatment option now appears promising, according to results of

Scientists calculate radiation dose in bone from victim of Hiroshima bombing: In an article published in PLOS ONE, Brazilian researchers describe the first retrospective dosimetric study by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using human tissue from nuclear attack victims

The bombing of the Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States in 1945 was the first and only use of nuclear weapons against civilian targets. A series of studies began in its aftermath to measure the impact of the fallout, in terms of both the radiation dose to which the victims were exposed

CRISPR/Cas9 silences gene associated with high cholesterol: Technique allowed researchers to reduce blood cholesterol levels in adult mice for six months following a single treatment

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used a CRISPR/Cas9 genetic engineering technique to turn off a gene that regulates cholesterol levels in adult mice, leading to reduced blood cholesterol levels and gene repression lasting for six months after a single treatment. This marks the first time researchers have delivered CRISPR/Cas9 repressors for targeted therapeutic gene