Category: Health News

Dementia: How circadian clock controls daily rhythms of aggression: New findings shed light on the early-evening agitation known as ‘sundowning,’ common in patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia commonly experience the sundown syndrome — a sudden worsening of confusion, agitation and aggression at the end of the day. Its daily pattern suggested that “sundowning,” as the phenomenon is also known, may be governed by the body’s internal biological clock. Synchronized by light and darkness,

Checklist: 10 steps to future-proof enterprise imaging

While no one can say with certainty all the ways enterprise imaging may evolve in the years to come, healthcare provider organization and enterprise imaging vendor executives in the know have strongly-held beliefs about some of the ways the technology will change. They also can pinpoint steps hospitals and systems should be taking today to

Separating the hype from reality in healthcare AI

Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning technology are sweeping most tech sectors and industries, and healthcare is no exception. In fact, at HIMSS18, no technology was hotter than AI. "Artificial intelligence has been around for a while, but why all the buzz around it now?" said HIMSS 2018 AI panelist Pamela Peele, chief analytics officer at University of Pittsburgh

Is there a link between your pets and your food choices?

People who grow up with a greater variety of pets are significantly more likely to follow a vegetarian diet as adults, according to research by a professor-student team in the University at Albany psychology department. Sydney Heiss, graduate student in the department of psychology, worked with assistant professor Julia Hormes to gain a better understanding

Alpha-gal found to be both a medication and red meat allergy

Alpha-gal allergy has commonly been referred to as “the red meat” allergy, but doctors at the Vanderbilt Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (ASAP) helped uncover that not only red meat, but some medications, can contain alpha-gal. Cosby Stone, MD, a fellow in the ASAP clinic, said recent patients have led researchers to take a deeper

The bad habits that lead to weight gain

(HealthDay)—It’s no secret that weight gain results from consuming too many calories. But at its core is an imbalance of healthy and unhealthy habits. On one side of the scale—the healthy side—are foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables, lean protein and plant-based fats. On the other side are the not-so-healthy options—sugary foods, those

Scientists unlock path to use cell’s own nanoparticles as disease biomarkers: Extracellular vesicles can now be identified at the individual level

Researchers at the University of Sydney have established a method to identify individual nanoparticles released by human cells, opening the way for them to become diagnostic tools in the early-detection of cancers, dementia and kidney disease. The particles, known as extracellular vesicles, or EVs, are routinely released by cells and play a central role in

Overeating? It may be a brain glitch

With springtime comes the desire to shed those few extra pounds, in preparation to don swimsuits and head to the pool. This year, new obesity research is making it easier to find a pathway that is right for us. There is no doubt that weight loss is a higher priority than ever before. Americans have

Scientists discover a role for ‘junk’ DNA

Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have determined how satellite DNA, considered to be “junk DNA,” plays a crucial role in holding the genome together. Their findings, published recently in the journal eLife, indicate that this genetic “junk” performs the vital function of ensuring that chromosomes

The secret to being cool: Try smiling

For many people, one of the unspoken rules for being cool is maintaining an emotionally inexpressive attitude. This message is reinforced through advertisements where fashion models rarely smile and by quotes from celebrities. In an article in the Huffington Post, Kanye West said he doesn’t smile in photographs because “it just wouldn’t look as cool.”

Doctors evaluate 4 popular trends in dieting

Thinking of trying that trendy diet your friends raved about on Instagram? Before you’re ready to declare the latest celebrity fad the best diet plan, check the science first. While many diets promise quick weight loss, they often have a downside. We asked two USC experts to help us separate truth from hype for four

Geisinger execs: DNA sequencing program saving patient lives

Geisinger Health System CEO David Fineberg, MD, and other top executives said Geisinger’s gene sequencing program is helping to better project adverse health issues in the short-term and the hospital is expecting even better results to come. Geisinger’s DNA sequencing project has the potential to identify virtually everyone in its patient population to pinpoint increased

Genetic variant might be a better marker for heart disease

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have found that a newly identified subset of a known genetic variant found primarily in individuals of South Asian descent may be a better marker for carriers of heart dysfunction in this population and that individuals with this genetic variant are more likely to develop

Humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birth

Vertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal

New study advocates for better information about PET/CT scanning

Improved information before undergoing PET/CT scanning can improve patients’ experience of care, demonstrates radiology nurse Camilla Andersson in a recent dissertation at Uppsala University. PET/CT scanning is increasingly common for various oncological matters, but it also requires care recipients to understand and follow instructions. Unprepared patients may entail delayed exams and postponed treatment, which can