Category: Health Problems

Addressing the emotional toll of pediatric chronic conditions

Be it autism, sickle cell or other life-disrupting health conditions, being the parent of a child with a chronic condition takes a psychological toll. For too many families, however, emotional and behavioral health support has been far too difficult to obtain. Now, a project led by experts at Cincinnati Children’s reports on the progress made

Missing protein in brain causes behaviors mirroring autism

Scientists at Rutgers University-Newark have discovered that when a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire—causing an imbalance in its circuitry that can lead to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorder. “During brain development, there is

Disorderly DNA helps cancer cells evade treatment

Each cell in the human body holds a full two meters of DNA. In order for that DNA to fit into the cell nucleus—a cozy space just one hundredth of a millimeter of space—it needs to be packed extremely tight. A new Northwestern University study has discovered that the packing of the three-dimensional genome structure,

Don’t wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery

Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. The results, published today in JAMA Neurology, suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery. “Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking appropriate, specialized care early on.

Young women still may be getting unnecessary pelvic exams

Pelvic examinations and cervical cancer screenings are no longer recommended for most females under age 21 during routine health visits, but a new study has found that millions of young women are unnecessarily undergoing the tests, which can lead to false-positive testing, over-treatment, anxiety and needless cost. Researchers at UC San Francisco and the Centers

What is CBD and what are its health benefits?

Increasingly, products containing cannabidiol, or CBD, a chemical component of cannabis, are popping up at grocery stores, gas stations, drugstores, and internet marketplaces. Celebrated for its purported therapeutic effects and legal when derived from hemp—a form of the cannabis plant—CBD can be found in shampoos, hand lotions, skin creams, and even dog treats. Far-reaching medical

Researchers identify starting point for designing drugs that cure clostridium difficile

A newly published paper in PNAS details a research breakthrough that provides a promising starting point for scientists to create drugs that can cure C. diff—a virulent health care-associated infection that causes severe diarrhea, nausea, internal bleeding, and potentially death. The bacteria affects roughly half-a-million Americans and causes nearly 15,000 deaths in the U.S. annually.

Public insurance tied to lower cancer survival in young patients

(HealthDay)—Young, low-income patients with bone or soft tissue sarcomas have decreased overall survival (OS), regardless of disease stage at presentation, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Cancer Medicine. Neela L. Penumarthy, M.D., from Seattle Children’s Hospital, and colleagues used data from the University of California San Francisco Cancer Registry to identify patients

Hematopoietic stem cell marker: A key player in the ontogeny of hematopoiesis

A group of researchers at Osaka University revealed that endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM), a surface marker for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and vascular endothelial cells (ECs), played an important role in the ontogeny of hematopoiesis in mice, particularly in the development of adult-type erythropoiesis. Their research results were published in Stem Cell Reports. In

Overdose, relapse after buprenorphine discontinuation high

(HealthDay)—Buprenorphine treatment may be needed for several years after an opioid overdose to reduce the risk of overdose and other adverse events, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Arthur Robin Williams, M.D., from the New York State Psychiatric Institute at the Columbia University Medical Center in New

Fatty diets tied to leading cause of vision loss in seniors

(HealthDay)—Diets heavy in red meat and fatty foods could help spur a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, new research suggests. The study found that people who ate more typical Western diets were three times more likely to develop an eye condition that robs you of your central vision—late-stage age-related macular degeneration. “What