Category: Health Problems

Can brain injury from boxing, MMA be measured?

For boxers and mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters, is there a safe level of exposure to head trauma? A new study shows different effects in the brain for younger, current fighters compared to older, retired fighters. The study is published in the December 23, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American

High fat diet impairs new neuron creation in female mice

A high fat diet limits the birth and growth of new neurons in adult female, but not male, mice, according to new research published in eNeuro. Further research could inspire metabolism-based preventions and treatments for brain disorders. Metabolic disorders like obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk for brain disorders ranging

The hidden psychology of the Christmas ‘poker face’

Imagine the scene—gleeful children ripping open presents, harassed parents surveying the carnage of once-tidy homes, disgruntled relatives muttering disapproval into their third glass of sherry. All familiar sights around Christmas, when the social obligations of the festive season draw people together with their kith and kin. This type of social event is perfectly natural. Humans

Some U.S. adults unaware of any myocardial infarction symptoms

(HealthDay)—A considerable proportion of U.S. adults are unaware of some or all of the symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Dec. 18 in JAMA Network Open. Shiwani Mahajan, M.B.B.S., from Yale New Haven Health in Connecticut, and colleagues examined variation and disparities in awareness of MI symptoms among U.S. adults

New app will open eyes to vision issues in babies

An app that helps student midwives detect rare eye conditions in newborns has been developed by a lecturer at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). All babies are screened for congenital abnormalities, including eye issues, within 72 hours of birth under the Newborn Infant and Physical Examination program (NIPE). However because eye conditions at birth are rare,

Only 1 in 10 suicide prevention apps cover all the recommended strategies, study finds

Most (93 percent) mobile apps for suicide prevention and depression management do not provide all the six suicide prevention strategies that are commonly recommended in international clinical guidelines, a study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found. International guidelines from the U.K., U.S. and the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommend six evidence-based

Puppies: They’re cute, cuddly and making people ill, CDC says

(HealthDay)—Puppies in pet stores appear to have transmitted a dangerous, antibiotic-resistant germ that’s sickened 30 people across 13 states, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned on Tuesday. The infection in question is a multidrug-resistant form of Campylobacter jejuni, the agency said in a statement. So far, of 24 patients interviewed by the

New study sheds light into origins of neurodegenerative disease

New research has shed light on the origins of spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) and demonstrates effective new therapeutic pathways for SCA7 and the more than 40 other types of spinocerebellar ataxia. The study, which appears online Monday on the website of the journal Neuron, implicates metabolic dysregulation leading to altered calcium homeostasis in neurons

Free tool simplifies cancer research

Every cell contains a vast number of proteins, each of which has a specific function, for example, as a receptor for another molecule or an enzyme that catalyzes chemical reactions. Disorders of such mechanisms can seriously affect a cell and cause diseases such as cancer, in which the sick cell functions fundamentally differently from a

In surprise decision, US approves muscular dystrophy drug

U.S. health regulators approved a second drug for a debilitating form of muscular dystrophy, a surprise decision after the medication was rejected for safety concerns just four months ago. The ruling marks the second time the Food and Drug Administration has granted preliminary approval for the disease based on early results and is likely to

Residual cancer burden after neoadjuvant therapy can accurately predict breast cancer survival

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported results from a pooled analysis of more than 5,100 breast cancer patients that found residual cancer burden (RCB) continuous index and classification were independently and strongly prognostic for all breast cancer phenotypes. The study’s results were presented by W. Fraser Symmans, M.D., professor

Metabolic adaptation ensures survival of colon cancer cells

Colon cancer cells deficient in p53, one of the most important control proteins in cell growth, activate a particular metabolic pathway to adapt to the lack of oxygen and nutrients inside the tumor. Statins, which are often prescribed to lower cholesterol, block this metabolic pathway and cause the cancer cells to die, as scientists from

Insurance disparities ID’d in diagnosis of late-stage melanoma

For nonelderly adults in the United States, having Medicaid or no health insurance is associated with increased odds of being diagnosed with late-stage melanoma compared with having private insurance, according to a study recently published online in Cancer. Boya Abudu, M.D., M.P.H., from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues