Category: Health Problems

Stress hormones spike as the temperature rises

A new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer. Researchers will present their findings today at the American

Ethics debate overdue in human brain research: experts

What if human brain tissue implanted into a pig transferred some of the donor’s self-awareness and memories? Such a scenario, out of reach for now, is becoming more and more conceivable, according to a group of scientists, ethicists, and philosophers who called Wednesday for a debate on the ethics of storing and using human brain

Back in black for singletons trying to find love

Black beats red as the colour of choice when it comes to finding new love, according to new research based on the hit TV series First Dates, which shows that single people wear more of the darker hue when meeting a potential partner for the first time. The study builds on previous research into the

Who (really) wants gaydar to be accurate anyway?

Researchers from the University of Surrey, Instituto Universitario in Portugal and University of Padua in Italy, studied whether heterosexual, homosexual and lesbian men and women believe their voice is an indicator of their sexual orientation to others and their desire for it to be disclosed. Surveying 241 men and women (heterosexual, homosexual and lesbian) researchers

Evening preference linked to higher BMI in type 2 diabetes

(HealthDay)—Evening preference and a later breakfast are associated with elevated body mass index (BMI) in adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online April 13 in Diabetic Medicine. Hataikarn Nimitphong, M.D., from Mahidol University in Bangkok, and colleagues examined the correlations among meal timing, morning-evening preference, and BMI in 210 non-shift workers

Exercise intervention doesn’t improve walking ability in PAD

(HealthDay)—For patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a home-based exercise intervention does not improve walking ability over nine months compared with usual care, according to a study published in the April 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Mary M. McDermott, M.D., from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago,

Hospitals often missing dementia despite prior diagnosis

Hospitals in the UK are increasingly likely to recognise that a patient has dementia after they’ve been admitted for a different reason, finds a new UCL-led study, but it is still only recognised in under two-thirds of people. This is the first study to identify an improvement in dementia diagnosis in hospitals over time, and

In Huntington’s disease, heart problems reflect broader effects of abnormal protein

Researchers investigating a key signaling protein in Huntington’s disease describe deleterious effects on heart function, going beyond the disease’s devastating neurological impact. By adjusting protein levels affecting an important biological pathway, the researchers improved heart function in experimental animals, shedding light on the biology of this fatal disease. “Heart disease is the second leading cause

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complication

An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what’s known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells

People expect their memory to fade as early as their 50s

People across the UK expect their memory to worsen in their 50s, according to new research from Heriot-Watt University. The results from the “What Keeps You Sharp?” survey, released today, reveals the majority of those asked believe lifestyle and genetics are equally important contributors to the changes they might experience. Almost nine out of 10

Patients prefer doctors who engage in face-to-face visits

(HealthDay)—Patients prefer physicians who engage in face-to-face (F2F) clinic visits, rather than those using an examination room computer (ERC), according to a research letter published online April 19 in JAMA Oncology. Ali Haider, M.D., from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled crossover study involving 120

Researchers use spider venom compound to treat paralysis

A team of Russian scientists together with foreign colleagues, reports that the venom of the crab spider Heriaeus melloteei may be used as a basis for a treatment against hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This disease is caused by genetic mutation that leads to the occurrence of the so-called ω-currents, or leakage currents, via voltage-gated ion channels