Category: Health Problems

Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes

Seeking the feel good factor? Go natural. That is the simple message from University of Otago researchers who have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables. Dr. Tamlin Conner, Psychology Senior Lecturer and lead author, says public health campaigns have historically focused

What you need to know about fever in adults

(HealthDay)—When it comes to a fever, what’s true for kids isn’t necessarily so for adults. Even a slight temperature in a child warrants a call to the doctor. That’s not the case, though, for most fevers in most adults. What’s considered a normal temperature varies from one adult to the next. In general, though, 98.6

UN’s health body urges Hepatitis C offensive

Hepatitis C is easily cured. Yet, about 400,000 people die of the liver disease every year as only a smattering get the medicine they need. On Friday, the World Health Organization (WHO) urged governments to attack the problem with more urgency, and more money. Only about three million people from an estimated 71 million Hepatitis

Germany: compensated cirrhosis substantially increases comorbidities and healthcare costs

An analysis of outcomes and costs for German patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) who develop compensated cirrhosis was presented today at The International Liver Congress 2018 in Paris, France. Healthcare costs for this population spiked in the first year after compensated cirrhosis diagnosis. Comorbidities were common and one in five patients

Cancer protein could point to new targets for treatment

A new view of a protein frequently mutated in pituitary tumors is overturning conventional wisdom and could point to novel targets for cancer drugs. The protein, a “G protein” called Gαs, initiates messages inside cells. But a single mutation alters Gαs action in a surprising way. The protein’s molecular “off switch” actually switches activity on,

Smart egg cartons to transport cells to cure diabetes

We have developed “smart egg carton” packages for transporting live human pancreas cells for transplantation to diabetic patients. The egg cartons provide oxygen and allow physical separation to prevent damage and death to the cells – known as islet cells – during transport. Besides a whole pancreas transplant (which has a high mortality rate), currently

FDA approves contact lenses that shade the sun

(HealthDay)—The lives of contact lens wearers just got a whole lot easier. On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first contact lenses that can act like sunglasses. A special additive automatically darkens the lenses when exposed to bright light, while they become clear again in normal or dark lighting conditions. “This contact

Immune-engineered device targets chemo-resistant lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer that is diagnosed in the U.S. more than 70,000 times annually, arises from overly proliferating immune cells within the body’s lymph nodes, which are connected to a network of lymph vessels through which lymphatic fluid flows. The most common type of lymphoma is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), accounting for about

Endocrine therapy-induced alopecia seen in breast cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with breast cancer, endocrine therapy-induced alopecia (EIA) has a pattern that is similar to androgenetic alopecia, according to a study published online April 11 in JAMA Dermatology. Azael Freites-Martinez, M.D., from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study to characterize EIA in 112

Microscopic oxygen bubbles could help improve cancer therapeutics, speed wound healing

A Purdue University-patented technology shows promise in using microscopic bubbles filled with oxygen to help with various medical treatments, including improving cancer therapeutics and helping wounds heal faster. Samara Biotech LLC, a Purdue startup, has developed an easy-to-use method to inject oxygen “nanobubbles” intravenously so they can be targeted precisely at wounds or cancerous tumors.

Statins associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

A large register-based study conducted in Sweden has found that statins are associated with a markedly reduced risk of all-cause mortality, liver transplantation, liver cancer, and variceal bleeding in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The study, which reviewed the records of almost 3,000 patients diagnosed with PSC between 2005 and 2016, also reported a

Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma likely to be cost effective

Surveillance for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by ultrasound is likely to be cost effective in patients with hepatitis C-related liver cirrhosis after they have achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) to direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), according to the results of a Canadian study presented today. The study also found that screening is very unlikely to be

The secret to being cool: Try smiling

For many people, one of the unspoken rules for being cool is maintaining an emotionally inexpressive attitude. This message is reinforced through advertisements where fashion models rarely smile and by quotes from celebrities. In an article in the Huffington Post, Kanye West said he doesn’t smile in photographs because “it just wouldn’t look as cool.”