Category: Health Problems

Even short travel can spread colistin-resistant bacteria

The emergence of antibiotic resistance among dangerous pathogens is increasingly problematic worldwide. Many strains of infectious bacteria have become multidrug-resistant, and cannot be treated with common antibiotic therapies. While the antibiotic colistin can often be used to treat infections by multidrug-resistant bacteria, colistin resistance is also on the rise and represents an emerging global health

Immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit: Further evidence in lung cancer

Further evidence that immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit for patients with lung cancer was presented today at ELCC 2018 (European Lung Cancer Congress) in Geneva, Switzerland. Researchers presented the three-year survival results of the randomised phase 2 POPLAR trial in second line, which is the longest follow-up reported to date with anti-programmed death ligand 1

U.S. heart disease rates falling, but gains vary by state

(HealthDay)—The overall rate of heart disease in the United States has declined 38 percent since 1990, a new report shows. Not every state has benefited equally, however. Between 2010 and 2016, 12 states actually saw their heart disease rates begin to creep up again, the data showed. And although the United States as a whole

Simultaneous chemo and immunotherapy may be better for some with metastatic bladder cancer

Researchers from Mount Sinai and Sema4, a health information company and Mount Sinai venture, have discovered that giving metastatic bladder cancer patients simultaneous chemotherapy and immunotherapy is safe and that patients whose tumors have certain genetic mutations may respond particularly well to this combination approach, according to the results of a clinical trial published in

RB1 gene mutations underlie clinical resistance to CDK 4/6 inhibitor breast cancer therapy

A multi-institutional research team has identified what may be a novel mechanism underlying acquired resistance to CDK 4/6 inhibitor treatment for breast cancer. In their report published in the Annals of Oncology, the team—led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Institute Gustave Roussy in Paris, and Texas Oncology-Baylor Sammons Cancer Center/U.S. Oncology in Dallas—reports

How mice are hardwired for parenting

For the first time, scientists have deconstructed the brain circuits that orchestrate parenting behavior in mice. The team, led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Catherine Dulac, has discovered that more than 20 different parts of the brain are integrated into this circuitry. Distinct sets of cells within a parenting-control hub trigger the motivational, behavioral,

There’s a better way to screen for cervical cancer

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions. Cervical cancer is caused by persistent

DPP-4I not tied to increased risk of acute pancreatitis in seniors

(HealthDay)—For older adults, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4Is) are not associated with increased risk of acute pancreatitis, according to a study published online April 4 in Diabetes Care. Jin-Liern Hong, Ph.D., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues examined the risks of acute pancreatitis among U.S. Medicare beneficiaries, aged 66+ years,

Video games may be OK for toddlers—if mom or dad join in

(HealthDay)—Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games—as long as you’re playing with them. That’s the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids’ development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage in

Better diagnosing heart transplant rejection and injury

The results of an international clinical trial for a new system of diagnosing heart transplant rejection and injury will be presented publicly for the first time at the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) annual meeting, which will take place on April 11 and 12 in Nice, France. Led by Dr. Phil Halloran

New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancer

Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.

Heart screening could protect hundreds from stroke

Testing Māori and Pacific people for an irregular heartbeat earlier could spare hundreds of people from stroke each year, a University of Auckland study has found. The research, a collaboration between University researchers and the Heart Research Institute in Sydney, reveals for the first time that Māori and Pacific people develop Atrial Fibrillation (AF) an

Pharmacists play role in cutting hospital-acquired infections

(HealthDay)—Pharmacists have been involved in the recent progress made toward reducing hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), according to an article published in Drug Topics. According to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2008 and 2016 there was a 50 percent decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections as well as other

Blood flow is a major influence on tumor cell metastasis

Scientists have long theorized that blood flow plays an integral role in cancer metastasis. But new research testing this long-held hypothesis in zebrafish and humans confirms that the circulatory blood flow impacts the position where circulating tumor cells ultimately arrest in the vasculature and exit into the body, where they can form a metastasis. In