Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub—at a cost

Some human brains are nearly twice the size of others—but how might that matter? Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and their NIH grant-funded colleagues have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain’s shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional

Kidstrology: Your Parenting Horoscope for June

June has finally arrived, and after a long, gloomy winter, the first day of summer is in sight. (And you thought this day would never come!) This month puts Gemini front and center, and whether or not you’re the sign of the twins, June has a double-sided energy to it. This month, we spoke to

Genomic medicine may one day revolutionize cardiovascular care

A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening. “The promise of genomic medicine is to be able to use a patient’s

Schatzki ring: What to know, imaging, and treatment

When a ring forms, a person may have no symptoms. Or, they may have difficulty swallowing, which the medical community calls dysphagia. The difficulty may get worse when a person eats dry bread or meat. Schatzki rings are not cancerous, and they are usually harmless. Changing the diet and patterns of eating can help with

Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in mice

An antifungal medication, commonly prescribed for toenail infections, could help eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumours, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine today. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute have shown in laboratory studies in mice, that itraconazole effectively halts the growth

Promise of faster, more accessible schizophrenia diagnosis: Researchers explore eye function in schizophrenia as a window into the brain

A portable device common in optometrists’ offices may hold the key to faster diagnosis of schizophrenia, predicting relapse and symptom severity and assessing treatment effectiveness, a Rutgers University study finds. In the study, published in the May 2018 issue of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, researchers used RETeval, a hand-held device developed to record electrical

Chemical used in packaging and disposable cups probably causes cancer

Common chemical used in plastic packaging and disposable cups is ‘probably carcinogenic for humans’, the World Health Organisation has warned Styrene, a chemical used to make rubber and plastics, is ‘probably carcinogenic’ Its rating was upgraded from possibly cancer-causing after thorough research Exposure to the chemical at work raises risk of leukaemia and nasal cancer 

Oral propranolol seems safe for infantile hemangioma

(HealthDay)—The safety profile of oral propranolol seems to be good for children with infantile hemangioma, according to a study published online May 29 in Pediatrics. Catherine Droitcourt, M.D., from the University of Rennes in France, and colleagues used the French National Health Insurance system to perform a survey of a nationwide cohort of children aged

Is eating ice bad for you?

However, continually craving ice and crunching on ice cubes could be bad for a person’s teeth and may be a sign of an underlying condition that requires medical attention. Read on to discover the possible causes of ice cravings and how to treat them. Underlying conditions that cause ice cravings The following conditions can make

Chile’s new sexual freedom leads to AIDS spike

The winds of change are blowing through Chile where a youthful sexual revolution is shattering taboos—but also sparking an explosion of HIV cases that has set off alarm bells in the traditionally conservative Latin American country. Chile has the highest rate of HIV cases in the region—some 5,816 new cases were registered last year, a

Scientists show how brain circuit generates anxiety: Research suggests a possible target for future anti-anxiety drugs

Neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified a neural circuit in the amygdala, the brain’s seat of emotion processing, that gives rise to anxiety. Their insight has revealed the critical role of a molecule called dynorphin, which could serve as a target for treatment of anxiety-related disorders including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Though

Mini-dose glucagon may halt post-exercise hypoglycemia

(HealthDay)—Mini-dose glucagon (MDG) is an effective approach for preventing exercise-induced hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online May 18 in Diabetes Care. Michael R. Rickels, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues aimed to determine whether MDG given subcutaneously pre-exercise could prevent glucose lowering and compared

Parents have concerns over food allergy precautions at schools

(HealthDay)—A substantial portion of parents whose children have food allergies have concerns over the safety of their child at school, according to a study published online May 12 in BMC Pediatrics. S. Shahzad Mustafa, M.D., from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in New York, and colleagues conducted an electronic survey of

Cellular recycling process is key to longer, healthier life

Building on two decades of research, investigators at UT Southwestern have determined that “cellular housekeeping” can extend the lifespan and healthspan of mammals. A study jointly led by Drs. Salwa Sebti and Álvaro Fernández, postdoctoral researchers in the Center for Autophagy Research, found that mice with persistently increased levels of autophagy—the process a cell uses