Educational interventions decrease sunburns among heavy equipment operators

Implementation of educational interventions among operating engineers (heavy equipment operators) in Michigan significantly increased the use of sunscreen and decreased the number of reported sunburns. The study is published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, by Sonia Duffy, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, cancer control researcher at The

From nettles to sunglasses, here’s 11 ways to beat hay fever hell

Soaring temperatures spell hay fever misery for millions but if you’re dosed up with antihistamine and still sneezing, you’d be forgiven for looking elsewhere for help. But with stinging nettles the latest “cure” taking social media by storm, which treatments really can help? 1. Stinging nettles Goran Pavlovic says that his sneezy symptoms disappeared once

Survey: Exercise and obesity are both rising in US

It may seem like a contradiction, but more adults in the U.S. say they are exercising at the same time more of them are becoming obese. About 24 percent of adults last year said they exercise enough each week to meet government recommendations for both muscle strengthening and aerobic exercise, according to a large annual

The One Natural Mosquito Repellent That Really Works

First things first: If you’re looking for a science-backed method of repelling mosquitoes, you don’t need to shy away from synthetic repellents such as DEET and picaridin. DEET in particular has been widely used for decades, and studies show it protects against mosquitoes and ticks carrying malaria, West Nile virus, Zika virus, and Lyme, according

The Tastiest Ways to Use Your Farmers Market Produce

There’s a lot to love about summer, whether your passion is a long day at the beach, a dip in the pool, or an adventure in the wilderness. But for our money, nothing beats the simple pleasure of heading to the farmers market to see the rich abundance of produce on display. It’s so much

Why Do Babies Kick in the Womb?

The first time a pregnant woman feels her baby kick can be surprising — a sudden reminder that the tiny creature growing inside her has a mind of its own. But why do babies kick? Though the womb is a tight space in which to exercise, it turns out that those kicks are vital for

Researchers find little association between suicide and hypoxia

Following an extensive analysis of published studies, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that while suicide rates are higher at higher altitudes, they are unlikely caused by hypoxia, (low oxygen) at these elevations. The study, published this month in the journal High Altitude Medicine & Biology, says suicide victims at

Nicotine alters neurotransmission in habit-forming brain region: Nicotine reduces dorsal striatal output, which may underlie urge to smoke and make it difficult to break the habit

A study of rat brain slices published in JNeurosci demonstrates how nicotine interacts with cells that regulate the output of a brain region involved in habit formation. The research could inform efforts to help people quit smoking and avoid relapse. The addictive qualities of nicotine have been attributed to the brain’s reward system. However, recent

The Common Symptoms That Might Be Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s can affect anyone, especially in later years. Males are more likely to get the disease, but it’s important for both aging males and females to know the signs. The following symptoms could signal Parkinson’s disease. Be sure to get checked out if you have one common irritable symptom (page 9). 1. You notice a

Blockade at the receptor

When chlamydia attacks the human body, the immune system activates. But the bacteria are adapted to defend themselves. Scientists from Würzburg have deciphered new details of their strategy. Chlamydia trachomatis is a common sexually transmitted disease. More than 131 million people are infected with this bacterium worldwide. If detected at an early stage and treated

Can older, frail patients benefit from ‘prehabilitation’ before heart surgery?

High risk, frail heart patients might derive benefits from “prehabilitation,” a strategy designed to enhance the recovery process after heart surgery by maintaining or improving the patient’s overall physical and mental status before surgery, according to a group of eminent cardiac specialists writing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The authors reviewed the current evidence

With gene editing, researchers cure blood disorder in fetal mice

With the combined efforts of three Yale laboratories, researchers conducted the first demonstration of site-specific gene editing in a fetus, correcting a mutation that causes a severe form of anemia. The technique, described in a paper published June 26 in Nature Communications, involves an intravenous injection of nanoparticles carrying a combination of donor DNA and