Monitor detects dangerously low white blood cell levels: Technology could help prevent life-threatening infections in patients receiving chemotherapy

One of the major side effects of chemotherapy is a sharp drop in white blood cells, which leaves patients vulnerable to dangerous infections. MIT researchers have now developed a portable device that could be used to monitor patients’ white blood cell levels at home, without taking blood samples. Such a device could prevent thousands of

Sure, cancer mutates, but it has other ways to resist treatment

Because of advances in drug design and precision medicine, researchers have been able to target certain molecules within a cell at the root of a particular disease and to develop specific therapies to undo their damages. Today, precision targeting combines therapy decisions with molecular insights to offer hope after a life-changing cancer diagnosis. But there’s

Taming an unruly target in diabetes

Focusing on a simple hormone in us all, a Yale researcher has found specific forms of it that poke toxic holes in cells—a discovery that he is leveraging into a treatment for patients with diabetes. The research, published April 3 in Nature Communications, is also central to the recent awarding of two grants totaling $600,000

Smartphone app performs better than traditional exam in cardiac assessment: Randomized clinical trial

A smartphone application using the phone’s camera function performed better than traditional physical examination to assess blood flow in a wrist artery for patients undergoing coronary angiography, according to a randomized trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). These findings highlight the potential of smartphone applications to help physicians make decisions at the bedside.

Considering an employee for an overseas assignment? Study says personality has a big impact on how well they adjust

More globalization means more multinational corporations are increasingly sending their employees overseas, swelling the ranks of expatriates in foreign locales where they are strangers to the language, the culture and ways of doing business. A new study from Florida Atlantic University shows that expatriates’ personality characteristics have a lot to do with how well they

Energy-based devices work well for feminine rejuvenation

(HealthDay)—Energy-based devices are both safe and effective methods of nonsurgical treatment for feminine rejuvenation, according to a review published online March 10 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology. Michael Gold, M.D., from the Gold Skin Care Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a literature review to explore the safety, efficacy, tolerability, patient satisfaction, and

Outcomes-based pricing doesn’t cut costs of PCSK9 inhibitors

(HealthDay)—Outcomes-based pricing does not reduce the costs of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, according to a research letter published online April 3 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Dhruv S. Kazi, M.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues examined the effect of outcomes-based pricing on the cost-effectiveness of PCSK9

Mifepristone may halt growth of intracranial tumor that causes hearing loss

Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers have shown that mifepristone, a drug currently FDA-approved for chemical abortion, prevents the growth of vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma) cells. This sometimes-lethal intracranial tumor typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. The findings, published online today in Scientific Reports, suggest that mifepristone is a promising drug candidate to

Using ultrasound to help people walk again

Spinal cord injuries impact more than 17,000 Americans each year, and although those with incomplete injuries may regain control of their limbs, overall muscle strength and mobility is weakened. Neurorehabilitation using robotic exoskeletons or electrical stimulation devices can help a person regain movement through repeated exercise. The amount of assistance through these devices during neurorehabilitation

Paper: Surprise can be an agent of social change

A jolt of the unexpected can have far-reaching effects, according to new research from a University of Illinois expert who studies leadership and creativity. Surprises are memorable, able to garner attention and arouse emotion, but a less heralded effect is that they can serve to shift attitudes and provide an avenue to influence people, said

All that overtime could be killing you

(HealthDay)—A 40-hour work week may sound like a vacation to those burning the midnight oil. But a study in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine shows that consistently surpassing this standard can be detrimental to your health. Researchers said they found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart

Explainer: what is lupus and how is stress implicated?

Thanks to Selena Gomez and Dr. House, most of us have heard of lupus. But most of us don’t know what it is, and until recently, none of us were sure whether stress could be a risk factor. The simplest way to understand lupus is “your immune system gone wrong”. We have evolved powerful immune

Rumination leads to problems in boys with autism

Boys with autism are more prone to develop physical complaints, depression and aggressive behaviour. Psychologists at Leiden University have discovered that this is mainly related to rumination. Publication in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Research has shown that autisme not only leads to social problems. Young people with autism also suffer anxiety, depression