Who is using guns for suicide?

The average profile of an American using a gun for suicide is a married, white male over the age of 50 who is experiencing deteriorating health. “Gun suicides may be preventable particularly among older men who are being treated for failing health,” explained corresponding author Bindu Kalesan, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at Boston

Synaptic communication controls neuronal migration: New mechanism controls neuronal migration during brain development

The cerebral neocortex is responsible for higher brain functions, such as conscious thought and language, in humans. In the neocortex, neurons are precisely arranged in an ordered 6-layered structure. This neocortical structure is formed by the sequential generation of billions of neurons and their migration toward the brain surface in the fetal period. “Subplate neurons”

Probiotics useful in the fight against infection prevention

Probiotics may be a relatively safe, simple, and low-cost solution for preventing Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospital settings, according to two studies published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Both studies show that treating patients who received antibiotics with multi-strain probiotics, cut down

Geisinger injects machine learning into clinical workflow to find health problems faster

Geisinger doctors and researchers have trained computers to read CT scans of patients’ heads to detect a life-threatening form of internal bleeding called intracranial hemorrhage. Because early and accurate diagnosis is critical, leading hospitals are moving forward with precision medicine tactics built on artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies. Last week, for instance, Intermountain-owned Navican

The complicated biology of garlic

Researchers today generally agree that eating garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, in a review published April 26 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers in the UK argue that explaining exactly how

Oregon marijuana: Lots of data, few to analyze and check it

To the beat of electronic dance music, men and women inside a slate-gray building harvested marijuana plants festooned with radio-frequency identification tags. In another room, an employee entered the tag numbers into a government database. The cannabis tracking system used by Avitas, a marijuana company with a production facility in Salem, is the backbone of

Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identified

Scientists at Osaka University have discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduces the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake. Insulin is a hormone that facilitates glucose uptake. Insulin binds to cellular insulin receptors to activate Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 (IRS-1), taking in sugar through phosphorylation of Akt. If

Belief in fake causes of cancer is rife

Mistaken belief in mythical causes of cancer is rife according to new research jointly funded by Cancer Research UK and published today (Thursday) in the European Journal of Cancer. Researchers at University College London (UCL) and the University of Leeds surveyed 1,330 people in England and found that more than 40% wrongly thought that stress

New approach to treating patients with stage IV Wilms tumor: Four-year overall survival increased 12 percent for patients with stage IV Wilms tumor with lung metastases

A new study showing significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The outcomes of the study, “Treatment of Stage IV Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor With Lung Metastases: A Report From the Children’s Oncology Group AREN0533 Study,” will be a

Fetal immune system rejects the mother in preterm labor

Preterm labor, a common pregnancy complication, has long been a mystery to scientists. But a new study from UC San Francisco shows it may sometimes happen when the fetal immune system “wakes up” too early and begins to reject the mother, causing the uterus to start contracting. The researchers think the fetal immune system becomes