New study advocates for better information about PET/CT scanning

Improved information before undergoing PET/CT scanning can improve patients’ experience of care, demonstrates radiology nurse Camilla Andersson in a recent dissertation at Uppsala University. PET/CT scanning is increasingly common for various oncological matters, but it also requires care recipients to understand and follow instructions. Unprepared patients may entail delayed exams and postponed treatment, which can

There’s a better way to screen for cervical cancer

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions. Cervical cancer is caused by persistent

Free-range parenting laws letting kids roam could catch on

After Utah passed the country’s first law legalizing so-called free-range parenting, groups in states from New York to Texas are pushing for similar steps to bolster the idea that supporters say is an antidote for anxiety-plagued parents and overscheduled kids. Free-range parenting is the concept that giving kids the freedom to do things alone—like explore

Whole body CT doesn’t cut mortality in peds blunt trauma

(HealthDay)—Whole body computed tomography (WBCT) is not associated with reduced mortality compared with a selective CT approach among children with blunt trauma, according to a study published online April 9 in JAMA Pediatrics. James A. Meltzer, M.D., from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y., and colleagues conducted a retrospective multicenter cohort study

DPP-4I not tied to increased risk of acute pancreatitis in seniors

(HealthDay)—For older adults, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4Is) are not associated with increased risk of acute pancreatitis, according to a study published online April 4 in Diabetes Care. Jin-Liern Hong, Ph.D., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues examined the risks of acute pancreatitis among U.S. Medicare beneficiaries, aged 66+ years,

Video games may be OK for toddlers—if mom or dad join in

(HealthDay)—Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games—as long as you’re playing with them. That’s the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids’ development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage in

Better diagnosing heart transplant rejection and injury

The results of an international clinical trial for a new system of diagnosing heart transplant rejection and injury will be presented publicly for the first time at the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) annual meeting, which will take place on April 11 and 12 in Nice, France. Led by Dr. Phil Halloran

New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancer

Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.

First dynamic spine brace — robotic spine exoskeleton — characterizes spine deformities: Designed by Columbia Engineers, RoSE is first device to measure 3-D stiffness of human torso, could lead to new treatments for children with spine deformities such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis

Spine deformities, such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis (also known as “hunchback”), are characterized by an abnormal curvature in the spine. The children with these spinal deformities are typically advised to wear a brace that fits around the torso and hips to correct the abnormal curve. Bracing has been shown to prevent progression of the

State Department puts out RFI for a new EHR

The U.S. Department of State has released a request for information for a new electronic health record last week, stemming from a failed joint EHR implementation with the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard had attempted to share a hosted EHR with the State Department, known as the Integrated Health Information System, or IHiS. But the

Heart screening could protect hundreds from stroke

Testing Māori and Pacific people for an irregular heartbeat earlier could spare hundreds of people from stroke each year, a University of Auckland study has found. The research, a collaboration between University researchers and the Heart Research Institute in Sydney, reveals for the first time that Māori and Pacific people develop Atrial Fibrillation (AF) an

Pharmacists play role in cutting hospital-acquired infections

(HealthDay)—Pharmacists have been involved in the recent progress made toward reducing hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), according to an article published in Drug Topics. According to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2008 and 2016 there was a 50 percent decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections as well as other

Later school start times really do improve sleep time

The study aimed to investigate the short and longer-term impact of a 45-min delay in school start time on sleep and well-being of adolescents. Singapore leads the world in the Programme for International Student Assessment rankings, which measures international scholastic performance in 15-year-olds. East Asian students live in a culture where the importance of academic