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New study advocates for better information about PET/CT scanning

Improved information before undergoing PET/CT scanning can improve patients’ experience of care, demonstrates radiology nurse Camilla Andersson in a recent dissertation at Uppsala University. PET/CT scanning is increasingly common for various oncological matters, but it also requires care recipients to understand and follow instructions. Unprepared patients may entail delayed exams and postponed treatment, which can

There’s a better way to screen for cervical cancer

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions. Cervical cancer is caused by persistent

Video games may be OK for toddlers—if mom or dad join in

(HealthDay)—Parents, you may be able to stop feeling guilty about letting your toddlers play video games—as long as you’re playing with them. That’s the suggestion of a small study on the effects of touchscreen technology on kids’ development. The research dovetails with growing concern that toddlers might be harmed as technology takes center stage in

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, Md.

Understanding how neighborhood dynamics regulate mosquito bites is key to managing diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Today in Parasites & Vectors, researchers report that in Baltimore, Maryland, socioeconomic differences between neighborhoods influence bite risk, with rats being a primary blood meal source in lower income neighborhoods. Shannon LaDeau, a disease ecologist at

Juvederm Voluma XC feasible for correcting infraorbital hollows

(HealthDay)—Juvéderm Voluma XC is feasible and seems safe for correcting infraorbital hollows, according to a study published online April 5 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. Michael B. Hall, M.D., from the Buckingham Center for Facial Plastic Surgery in Austin, Texas, and colleagues conducted a retrospective observational study involving patients aged 21 to 85 years who

Factors ID’d for breastfeeding behavior in women with BMI >30

(HealthDay)—Five psychological factors are associated with breastfeeding behaviors among women with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m², according to a review published online March 24 in Obesity Reviews. Stephanie Lyons, from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, and colleagues examined the correlation between any psychological factor and breastfeeding behavior among women with a

A potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcoma

The sarcoma research group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has identified a potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcoma, the second most frequent bone cancer in children and adolescents, and a tumor known for its aggressiveness and tendency to metastasize. The research is published in the International Journal

Considering an employee for an overseas assignment? Study says personality has a big impact on how well they adjust

More globalization means more multinational corporations are increasingly sending their employees overseas, swelling the ranks of expatriates in foreign locales where they are strangers to the language, the culture and ways of doing business. A new study from Florida Atlantic University shows that expatriates’ personality characteristics have a lot to do with how well they

Energy-based devices work well for feminine rejuvenation

(HealthDay)—Energy-based devices are both safe and effective methods of nonsurgical treatment for feminine rejuvenation, according to a review published online March 10 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology. Michael Gold, M.D., from the Gold Skin Care Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a literature review to explore the safety, efficacy, tolerability, patient satisfaction, and

Experts define global criteria for hospital programs to tackle antimicrobial resistance

Infection specialists at hospitals are introducing so-called antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes to use antimicrobial drug therapies more responsibly. Such programmes include a coherent set of actions which promote using antimicrobials in ways that ensure sustainable access to effective therapy for all who need them. A group of international experts, led by researchers from the Center

Dietary supplement shows promise for reversing cardiovascular aging

Scientists have long known that restricting calories can fend off physiological signs of aging, with studies in fruit flies, roundworms, rodents and even people showing that chronically slashing intake by about a third can reap myriad health benefits and, in some cases, extend lifespan. From a public health perspective, that advice would be impractical for