Confining cell-killing treatments to tumors

Cytokines, small proteins released by immune cells to communicate with each other, have for some time been investigated as a potential cancer treatment. However, despite their known potency and potential for use alongside other immunotherapies, cytokines have yet to be successfully developed into an effective cancer therapy. That is because the proteins are highly toxic

Researchers look to unlock post-traumatic stress disorder puzzle

A team of Penn State and University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine researchers is attempting to answer a question that has long puzzled experts: Why do some individuals suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing trauma, and others do not? The research, led by Nanyin Zhang, professor of biomedical engineering and Lloyd & Dorothy

How To Increase Your Metabolism

Like the cloud and the gender pay gap, metabolism is one of those things that we know exists but we don’t totally understand. Our mums, friends and random shop assistants have told us that a fast one is good and a slow one is the pits, while people constantly talk about revving it up (yeah,

Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of ‘superbug’ MRSA

Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Wellcome Sanger Institute. Since the discovery of penicillin, the introduction of antibiotics to treat infections has revolutionised medicine and healthcare, saving millions of lives. However, widespread use (and misuse)

Water Check of Öko-Test: uranium, arsenic, pesticides – every 4. Bottled water is charged

Öko-Test examined 53 carbonated mineral water of the variety of “Classic”. Including water places of discounters and supermarkets, but also classic brands. The result: Twelve sparkling varieties contain questionable ingredients such as pesticide-degradation products, uranium, or arsenic. The German drank in the past year, 150 litres of water per head. 11.7 billion litres, according to

Molecular scissors stabilize the cell’s cytoskeleton

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Villigen, Switzerland, have for the first time elucidated the structure of important enzymes in human cells that alter essential building blocks of the cellular cytoskeleton. This reveals the missing part of a cycle that regulates the build-up or breakdown of supporting elements of the cell. The enzymes

Researchers improve classification of pancreatic cancer to better predict patient outcomes

Researchers at the University of Toronto and University Health Network have found that standard pathology grading for the most common type of pancreatic cancer can be improved to better predict patient outcomes. The research shows that conventional, histological analysis of pancreatic tumours—based in part on morphology, or shape and structure—can better predict outcomes by taking

Network analysis applied to the study of cerebral macroanatomy

The CENIEH researcher Emiliano Bruner has led a study which uses networks to investigate the geometric relationship among the principal regions of the cerebral cortex. Network analysis is used in fields as diverse as economics, engineering and sociology to analyze relationships among elements. Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la

Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. The study, published April 22 by Developmental Psychobiology, found that 11-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English—but not when