Category: Health News

Guidelines for thyroid surgery published

The first set of comprehensive, evidence-based clinical guidelines for surgical treatment of thyroid disease – developed by an expert panel assembled by the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES) – was published today by Annals of Surgery. The guidelines provide an expert perspective on current approaches to surgical management for patients with benign and malignant

What are viruses anyway, and why do they make us so sick?

You may sometimes have felt like you “have come down with a virus,” meaning that you became sick from being exposed to something that could have been a virus. In fact, you have a virus—actually, many—all the time. Some viruses cause the common cold, and some are crucial to human survival. New viruses can also

Research opens new avenues to reduce foot, toe amputations

Emerging research may help doctors devise better ways to prevent some of the tens of thousands of amputations unrelated to traumatic injury that occur in the U.S. each year. Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower limb amputations, including of the toe and foot. That’s partly because diabetes increases risk of peripheral artery disease,

Honeymooner who got coronavirus on Diamond Princess blasts government

’78 Brits, what the hell do they matter? They forgot us’: Honeymooner who caught coronavirus on doomed Diamond Princess blasts botched government evacuation and tells how his wife is ‘struggling’ on ship Alan Steele, from Wolverhampton, attacked UK Government for treating dozens of Brits onboard ‘badly’ Lorry driver feels betrayed by Foreign Office after US, Canada,

Swings in daily temperature may affect stroke severity

The highs and lows of the daily weather could signal something more important than which outfit to wear: A study from South Korea suggests the more temperatures fluctuate during the summer, the more severe strokes become. Connections between the weather and risk of stroke have been examined for years. To expand on that, researchers at

Common Cleaning Products May Put Infants at Risk for Asthma

Children living in a home with a greater use of any cleaning product during a child’s infancy increased the odds of a recurrent wheeze, recurrent wheeze with atopy, and asthma diagnosis. The highest risk of respiratory issue was associated with scented and sprayed cleaning products. The most common cleaning products used were dishwashing soap, dishwasher

Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2020 — Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it’s the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say. Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, according to a study published Feb. 17 in the journal Circulation. “One

Looking for clues to improve the life of a transplanted organ

The Transplant Research Program (TxRP) at Boston Children’s Hospital is the only pediatric transplantation research program in the U.S committed to better understanding the molecular basis for organ rejection after transplantation in children. Within the last year, members of the TxRP have initiated a new initiative to extend the longevity of transplanted organs and to

Kate Middleton Says She “Quite Liked” Labour

While the Duchess of Cambridge usually keeps tight-lipped about the details of her personal life, she recently told the Happy Mum, Happy Baby podcast she “quite liked” being in labour. The 38-year-old credited her three positive birthing experiences to meditation and hypnobirthing – a mindfulness practice that helps expectant mothers to alleviate any stress or

Fertility tests double as jobs take priority

The rise is a sign females are now postponing motherhood to focus on their careers, experts said.  Private healthcare firm Pall Mall Medical found more and more women are preparing to freeze their eggs by having fertility testing.  Analysis reveals the number of under-35s seeking testing has risen by 25 percent, with many women prioritising

Got stomach ache? Eat curd, says new study

The study argued that curd made of milk from a pure Indian cow breed contains useful bacteria species which can fight Aflatoxin B1 that is toxic and can cause stomach ache. Most of us like to eat curd, which is not just good to taste but also helps in digestion and keeps the skin healthy.

Flu season is getting weirder

Coronavirus may be in the headlines, but it’s still flu season, and a weird one at that — officials are seeing a new spike in flu activity as a second strain of flu hits on the heels of the first. The 2019-2020 flu season already had an unusual start — in December and early January,

Team explores pathway to open up blood cancer treatments

Reversing runaway inflammation in the bone marrow could lead to major breakthroughs in treatments for some blood cancers, according to a new publication by scientists at Hackensack Meridian Health’s Center for Discovery and Innovation. The CDI team’s findings could ultimately improve cancer treatments for people of advanced age, like that of adult acute myeloid leukemia

Orthostatic Hypotension During HTN Tx Not Tied to CVD Events

THURSDAY, Feb. 13, 2020 — Orthostatic hypotension (OH) during hypertension treatment is not associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease events, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Hypertension. Stephen P. Juraschek, M.D., from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues examined the association between OH and cardiovascular disease

InterSystems will spotlight its new interoperability hub at HIMSS20

InterSystems at HIMSS20 will highlight its new offering, HealthShare Managed Connections. The interoperability technology is designed to dramatically reduce the time and cost of connecting healthcare organizations. Today, most cross-organization connections are one-to-one, even though they include numerous interfaces to the same electronic health records and multiple connections to the same organizations. Connecting to an