Category: Health News

Prescription monitoring may curb inappropriate drug use, but what happens to those denied a script?

Restricting access to high-risk medications via a real-time prescription monitoring program such as Victoria’s SafeScript may help reduce inappropriate use, but integrated mental health and drug treatment services may be necessary to offset the risk of increased mortality, according to the authors of a letter published online by the Medical Journal of Australia. Researchers from

Pandemic becomes a patchwork of small successes and setbacks

Authorities in China appeared to be winning their battle against an outbreak of coronavirus in Beijing on Saturday, but in parts of the Americas the pandemic raged unabated. Brazil surpassed 1 million confirmed infections, second only to the United States. Europe, in contrast, continued to emerge warily from lockdown, with hard-hit Britain considering easing social

For Trump Corona belongs to the past

The Covid-19-pandemic keeps the world in breath. More than 8.5 million people have been infected so far worldwide, with the novel Coronavirus, 188.716 in Germany – where it always comes back to local outbreaks. For Trump Corona belongs to the past Despite a worrying increase in the Corona-infections in a number of U.S. States, and

When mosquito and tick season meets COVID-19

With COVID-19 restrictions easing, people are spending more time at socially distanced outdoor gatherings, whether picnics in parks with friends or backyard movie nights with neighbors. But as we escape the confines of COVID-19 quarantines, we’re heading outside into peak mosquito and tick season. Have you stocked up on bug spray yet? Think back to

Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the

Chemical pollutants can trigger celiac disease in young people: Study

A new study linked chemical pollutants with celiac disease and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in young people. Pollution is like a slow poison. A new study ‘Persistent organic pollutant exposure and celiac disease: A pilot study‘ has linked chemical pollutants with celiac disease in young people. Celiac disease is a condition where the digestive process

Nation’s capital could move to phase 2 reopening next week

Washington, D.C., officials are targeting next Monday for the start of phase two of reopening the nation’s capital after months of social restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Mayor Muriel Bowser said Wednesday that she would make a final decision and announcement on Friday. But if the numbers continue “trending in the right direction,” Bowser

National tick surveillance survey identifies gaps to be filled

New Cornell-led research shows that inadequate funding is the main barrier to better surveillance and control of ticks, including the blacklegged tick, which spreads Lyme disease, the No. 1 vector-borne illness in the country. Insufficient infrastructure, limited guidance on best practices and lack of institutional capacity also are impediments to improved tick monitoring, the researchers

Schools should be able to open after summer holidays again

The Covid-19-pandemic keeps the world in breath. More than 8.2 million people have been infected so far worldwide, with the novel Coronavirus, 186.834 in Germany – where it always comes back to local outbreaks. The schools are due to return after the summer holidays in all the countries in the control operation. This is true,

New Beijing outbreak raises virus fears for rest of world

China raised its emergency warning to its second-highest level and canceled more than 60% of the flights to Beijing on Wednesday amid a new coronavirus outbreak in the capital. It was a sharp pullback for the nation that declared victory over COVID-19 in March and a message to the rest of the world about how

Continuous glucose monitoring reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes

Results from a six-month, multi-site clinical trial called the Wireless Innovation for Seniors with Diabetes Mellitus (WISDM) Study Group have been published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Older adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a growing but under-studied population, are prone to hypoglycemia, particularly when diabetes is longstanding. Hypoglycemia can cause