Category: Health Problems

Study paves the way for better treatment of prostate cancer

A new study published today has found a way to identify men with locally advanced prostate cancer who are less likely to respond well to radiotherapy. Led by Professor Catharine West, The University of Manchester team created a method of selecting prostate cancer patients who would benefit from treatments which target oxygen deficient tumours. The

Depleted metabolic enzymes promote tumor growth in kidney cancer

Kidney cancer, one of the ten most prevalent malignancies in the world, has increased in incidence over the last decade, likely due to rising obesity rates. The most common subtype of this cancer is “clear cell” renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), which exhibits multiple metabolic abnormalities, such as highly elevated stored sugar and fat deposition. By

Molecular ‘rabble-rouser’ fuels pancreatic cancer growth

A type of molecular ‘rabble-rouser’ that triggers pancreatic cancer to become aggressive and spread around the body has been identified by scientists. The team behind the early-stage research, led by Imperial College London and funded by Pancreatic Cancer UK, say the findings may open avenues for treatments that target these molecules. The molecules, called microRNAs,

Nigeria and health epidemics: acting quickly for a reason

A new outbreak of Ebola that has killed 17 people in the Democratic Republic of Congo is thousands of miles (kilometres) from Nigeria. But health officials in Abuja this week moved quickly to introduce emergency measures, including screening visitors from the DRC and neighbouring countries—and for good reason. Not only was Nigeria one of the

This Type of Exercise May Help Relieve Depression

Strength training is good for your body and your mind, according to a new review of more than 30 previously published studies. The paper, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, found that resistance exercise training (RET), such as weightlifting and strength training, is associated with a significant reduction in depressive symptoms. It also, of course,

New cancer immunotherapy drugs rapidly reach patients after approval

The majority of patients eligible for cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors received treatment within a few months of FDA approval, according to a new Yale-led study. The finding suggests that cancer immunotherapies are adopted at a much quicker pace than is typical for newly approved medical treatments, the researchers said. However, patients receiving

Annual well woman visit to the OB/GYN can keep your heart healthy

Annual well woman exams by OB/GYNs provide a golden opportunity to evaluate a woman’s heart health, according to a new joint advisory from the American Heart Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) which stresses the benefits of collaborative care between OB/GYN specialists and cardiologists. As heart disease and stroke continue to

Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment

Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. A growing body of evidence helps psychiatrists to understand the aspects of brain structure and function involved

People with OCD process emotions differently than their unaffected siblings

A new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that people with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) feel more distress when viewing images to provoke OCD-related emotions than their unaffected siblings. Although the unaffected siblings showed lower levels of distress, they had higher levels of brain activity in regions important for attention. The findings suggest

New tool predicts deadly form of rare cancer

Two patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) can appear to have identical diseases upon first diagnosis but can have radically different outcomes. MF in an unusual cancer of the T lymphocyte that begins in the skin rather than in the lymph nodes, with the first sign often being a rash. Most patients with MF, the most

The joy of neurons: A simplified ‘cookbook’ for engineering brain cells to study disease

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised what they call a “neuronal cookbook” for turning skin cells into different types of neurons. As reported today in the journal Nature, the research opens the door to studying common brain conditions such as autism, schizophrenia, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease under reproducible conditions in a dish. “The