Tag: care

How specialist palliative care services around the world coped in response to COVID-19

Specialist palliative care services have been flexible, highly adaptive and have embraced a low-cost “frugal innovation” model in response to the COVID-19 pandemic say researchers. The CovPall study, published in Palliative Medicine, is a collaborative project between Lancaster University, Cicely Saunders Institute at King’s College London, Hull York Medical School and the University of York.

Why you shouldn’t neglect eye care during the pandemic

Since COVID-19 emerged, access to eye care has continued to change. Lockdowns and concerns about virus exposure have caused people of all ages to cancel and delay routine appointments, raising red flags among eye-care professionals. As the pandemic continues into its second year, can ocular health be neglected any longer? Our team of optometrists and

When should patients with dementia receive palliative care?

Patients with dementia may benefit from being referred to specialist palliative care—a branch of medicine that focuses on optimizing quality of life and providing relief from symptoms—but who should be referred, and when? A recent analysis of published studies on the topic found a lack of consensus regarding referral criteria for palliative care in patients

Patient-centered care during COVID-19 promoted

The COVID-19 pandemic has diminished people’s ability to make in-person, human connections, and such relationships are especially important in health care. However, healthcare organizations can improve connections with their patients, according to a review article from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa public health researchers published in Quality Management in Health Care. Researchers including AJ Patil,

Low-income preschoolers exposed to nurturing care have with higher IQ scores later on

Preschoolers living in impoverished communities who have access to a nurturing home environment have significantly higher intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in adolescence compared to those raised without nurturing care. That is the finding of a new international study conducted by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers, which examined data from more than 1600

Highmark Health begins partnership with Google Cloud to build up new care delivery model

Highmark Health, in collaboration with Google Cloud, today announced its Living Health model and corresponding platform that aims to reshape how healthcare is delivered to be a more coordinated, personalized and technology-enabled experience. Throughout the companies’ six-year strategic partnership, Highmark will support its Living Health model through the development of the Living Health Dynamic Platform,

Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19

Health care workers—particularly nurses—have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to researchers at Rutgers, which released baseline results from a large prospective study of participants at Rutgers and affiliated hospitals recruited during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, published in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, found that

Minorities benefit less from regionalizing heart attack care

California’s Black and Hispanic communities may be falling further behind whites in the quality of care they receive for heart attacks, despite recent medical efforts aimed at improving the standards of care for these populations, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. In response to ongoing health disparities, emergency management

Delaying cancer care costs lives

(HealthDay)—Even as the coronavirus pandemic has postponed the delivery of many kinds of health care, a new study suggests that delaying cancer treatment by even a month can raise your risk of dying by 6% to 13%, and that risk keeps rising the longer treatment is delayed. The increased risk of death for seven types

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients

Adults from underrepresented racial groups who have acute heart blockages and cardiac arrests received fewer early interventions, had longer hospital stays and higher death rates than their white counterparts, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Resuscitation Science Symposium 2020. Researchers set out to investigate whether health inequities exist for

Telemedicine reduces cancellations for care during COVID in large Ohio heath center

New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that expanded use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic improved cancelation rates, no-shows and completed medical visits for rheumatology ambulatory clinics in one large Ohio health system (ABSTRACT #1584). Telemedicine is the practice of medicine at a physical distance using various

Many Americans struggling to afford health care in pandemic

More than two in five working-age U.S. adults didn’t have stable health insurance in the first half of 2020, while more than one-third struggled with medical bills, according to a new survey. “The survey shows a persistent vulnerability among U.S. working-age adults in their ability to afford coverage and health care. That vulnerability could worsen

Care for the caregiver in the age of coronavirus

While staying at home to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 can be challenging, doing so as someone who’s providing in-home care for vulnerable adults comes with added complications. There are more than 43 million caregivers in the U.S. providing unpaid care for those 65 and older with a variety of physical and cognitive limitations.