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Virus prevention measures turn violent in parts of Africa

Police fired tear gas at a crowd of Kenyan ferry commuters as the country’s first day of a coronavirus curfew slid into chaos. Elsewhere, officers were captured in mobile phone footage whacking people with batons. Virus prevention measures have taken a violent turn in parts of Africa as countries impose lockdowns and curfews or seal

Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, study suggests

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility—the ability to adapt to changing situations. The gene, KCND2, codes for a protein that regulates potassium channels, which control electrical signals that travel along neurons. The electrical signals stimulate chemical messengers

2009 to 2015 saw increase in hyperglycemic events

(HealthDay)—From 2009 to 2015, there were increases in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state (HHS) events among adults, according to a study published online March 11 in Diabetes Care. Stephen R. Benoit, M.D., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues characterized emergency department visits and inpatient admissions with

Pets may protect against suicide in older people

It’s a sad fact that suicide rates among people over 60 are the highest of any age group in Australia, but a new study published today from the University of South Australia has found an unexpected savior—pets. The mere presence of a dog, cat, or even birds can be enough to stop some older people

Trump declares state of emergency in coronavirus-paralysed US

US President Donald Trump declared a national emergency in what critics say was a long-delayed admission of the gravity of the coronavirus crisis that has triggered the shutdown of schools, sporting events, offices and travel in the world’s richest country. Trump’s declaration Friday frees up some $40 billion in disaster relief funds for local authorities.

Guidelines detail management of liver failure in ICU patients

(HealthDay)—In an executive summary of a new guideline from the Society of Critical Care Medicine, published in the March issue of Critical Care Medicine, a set of evidence-based recommendations are presented for the management of liver failure in critically ill patients. Rahul Nanchal, M.D., from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, and colleagues developed

High levels of immunoglobulin E antibodies in microbiomes of people with peanut allergies

A team of researchers from Stanford University, the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center has found that people with peanut allergies have an abundance of allergy-causing immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE) in their guts. In their paper published in the journal Science Immunology, the group describes sequencing antibody genes from B-lineage plasma cells

Long-acting cabotegravir, rilpivirine noninferior in HIV-1

(HealthDay)—For patients with HIV-1 suppression, long-acting cabotegravir plus rilpivirine is noninferior to oral therapy with dolutegravir-abacavir-lamivudine and standard oral therapy, according to two studies published online March 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Chloe Orkin, M.D., from the Queen Mary University of London, and colleagues conducted a phase 3 randomized trial involving adults

Swings in daily temperature may affect stroke severity

The highs and lows of the daily weather could signal something more important than which outfit to wear: A study from South Korea suggests the more temperatures fluctuate during the summer, the more severe strokes become. Connections between the weather and risk of stroke have been examined for years. To expand on that, researchers at

Women Patients Still Missing in Heart Research

TUESDAY, Feb. 18, 2020 — Women remain underrepresented in heart disease research, even though it’s the leading cause of death among women worldwide, researchers say. Women accounted for less than 40% of all people enrolled in cardiovascular clinical trials from 2010 through 2017, according to a study published Feb. 17 in the journal Circulation. “One

Team tracks integrin’s role in lung function

Beta-1 integrin, a critical component of epithelial extracellular matrix receptors, is essential for normal lung function in adulthood, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have discovered. In a mouse model, deleting the gene for beta-1 integrin from the epithelial cells lining the alveoli of the adult lung, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide

Traces of immortality in tumor DNA

To gain an infinite lifespan, cancer cells need to maintain the ends of their chromosomes, known as telomeres. They achieve this in various ways. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center systematically investigated more than 2,500 tumor genomes of 36 types of cancer to find out how these mechanisms are manifest in changes in the

Attention, Keto Dieters: Almond Flour Is Ridiculously Low In Carbs

Walk into your local Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s these days and it’s almond flour-based everything. From cookies to crackers, these wheat-free eats certainly seem better for you—but is almond flour really that nutritious? “Besides having a slightly nutty, yet subtle flavor, almond flour is on fire because it’s gluten-free andcontains more protein than regular

Social isolation results in memory loss in later life

Social isolation contributes to memory loss in older age, research by LSE’s Care and Evaluation Centre has shown for the first time. The paper, published in Journals of Gerontology, found that both men and women were affected, but in different ways. Men with high levels of social isolation experienced subsequent memory decline. For women it