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Researchers identify possible immune targets in the SARS-CoV-2 genome

Otago researchers studying the COVID-19 virus (SARS-2) have discovered potential target points on its genome, which may contribute to future treatments for the virus. While their laboratory was locked down during the Level 4 period, Ph.D. student Ali Hosseini and Professor Alex McLellan from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology worked from their homes to

Genetic tests may differ in their interpretation of certain variants

(HealthDay)—Different genetic test interpretations have been identified for genetic variants, and some of these can impact patient management, according to a research letter published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Jeffrey A. SoRelle, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues examined the prevalence of different interpretations

Continuous glucose monitoring reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes

Results from a six-month, multi-site clinical trial called the Wireless Innovation for Seniors with Diabetes Mellitus (WISDM) Study Group have been published by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Older adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a growing but under-studied population, are prone to hypoglycemia, particularly when diabetes is longstanding. Hypoglycemia can cause

Low physical function and low muscle mass increase the risk for accelerated bone loss in older hip fracture patients

Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients. Acknowledgement of the risk factors is important for bone health and overall recovery. “Substantial decrements in physical function, muscle and bone strength occur after hip fracture, which markedly increase the risk for a

Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy

A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy. The results of the research study, “The Rhyme and Rhythm of Music in Epilepsy,”

COVID-19 loneliness linked to elevated psychiatric symptoms in older adults

Although social distancing is crucial in thwarting the spread of COVID-19, isolation and the ensuing loneliness may be severely detrimental for older adults. A new study conducted by researchers at Bar-Ilan University and the University of Haifa has linked COVID-19-based loneliness in older adults with elevated psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms that

Monkeys, ferrets offer needed clues in COVID-19 vaccine race

The global race for a COVID-19 vaccine boils down to some critical questions: How much must the shots rev up someone’s immune system to really work? And could revving it the wrong way cause harm? Even as companies recruit tens of thousands of people for larger vaccine studies this summer, behind the scenes scientists still

Air filters shown to improve breathing in children with asthma

(HealthDay)—Daily use of a fine particulate matter air filtration device can significantly improve airway mechanics and reduce airway resistance in children with asthma, according to a study recently published in JAMA Pediatrics. Xiaoxing Cui, Ph.D., of the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and colleagues performed a double-blind study

No new virus deaths in Ireland for first time 10 weeks

Ireland recorded no new deaths from the coronavirus on Monday for the first time since March 11, when the first fatalities were announced. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar called it a “significant milestone”, adding on Twitter: “This is a day of hope. We will prevail.” The announcement came one week after Ireland, which has suffered 1,606

Study calls for better inclusion of same-sex attracted and gender diverse youth in sports

Western Sydney University researchers have found same-sex attracted and gender diverse (SSAGD) young people want to participate in sport, but past and current negative experiences, including those of violence and discrimination, can hold them back. The pilot study, which explored the experiences and attitudes towards sport, exercise and physical activity of 13 SSAGD young people

Here’s how to get good feng shui in your house

Feng shui is something we all need in our life. As Feng Shui expert and Nectar Life Hacks Host Priya Sher told Good Homes Magazine, “Its principles maintain that we live in harmony with our environment. Its aim is to achieve balance in your living and working space and maximize your potential for success in all