Tag: may

Posthospital follow-up visits for bronchiolitis may not be needed

(HealthDay)—As-needed follow-up is an equally effective posthospitalization follow-up strategy when compared with a scheduled follow-up visit for young children hospitalized for bronchiolitis, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Pediatrics. Eric R. Coon, M.D., from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and colleagues randomly assigned children younger than 24 months

Genetic tests may differ in their interpretation of certain variants

(HealthDay)—Different genetic test interpretations have been identified for genetic variants, and some of these can impact patient management, according to a research letter published online June 30 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Jeffrey A. SoRelle, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues examined the prevalence of different interpretations

Prescription monitoring may curb inappropriate drug use, but what happens to those denied a script?

Restricting access to high-risk medications via a real-time prescription monitoring program such as Victoria’s SafeScript may help reduce inappropriate use, but integrated mental health and drug treatment services may be necessary to offset the risk of increased mortality, according to the authors of a letter published online by the Medical Journal of Australia. Researchers from

Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the

Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy

A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr. Taufik Valiante of the Krembil Brain Institute at Toronto Western Hospital, part of University Health Network, has found that a Mozart composition may reduce seizure frequency in patients with epilepsy. The results of the research study, “The Rhyme and Rhythm of Music in Epilepsy,”

Missing sodium-channel component may protect against diet-induced artery stiffening

New research in mice finds that deficiency in one small component of a signaling pathway may protect against artery stiffening and subsequent kidney disease associated with a high-fat, high-sugar diet. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology. Consuming a western diet—typically high in fat and refined carbohydrates, including sugar—is associated with

Coronavirus death rate may be lower than previously thought

The coronavirus mortality rate might be lower than previously thought, according to a new study. A group of researchers analyzed data from China and found that the overall mortality rate of COVID-19 was 1.38%. But if they adjusted for cases that likely went unaccounted for due to their mild or asymptomatic nature, the overall mortality

Why a loss of smell may be a sign of coronavirus

Doctors say a complete loss of smell and taste may be an early warning sign of coronavirus… that could appear just hours after a sufferer is infected Doctors are calling for this to be added to other main symptoms of coronavirus Currently these are a continuous cough and/or a high temperature, says PHE But an

Pets may protect against suicide in older people

It’s a sad fact that suicide rates among people over 60 are the highest of any age group in Australia, but a new study published today from the University of South Australia has found an unexpected savior—pets. The mere presence of a dog, cat, or even birds can be enough to stop some older people

Certain combinations of cardiovascular drugs may reduce dementia risk

Specific combinations of statins and antihypertensives may also reduce risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new USC study of nearly 700,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The findings suggest that treatments already in use for blood pressure and cholesterol control could reduce the number of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, researchers said. The study was published

Swings in daily temperature may affect stroke severity

The highs and lows of the daily weather could signal something more important than which outfit to wear: A study from South Korea suggests the more temperatures fluctuate during the summer, the more severe strokes become. Connections between the weather and risk of stroke have been examined for years. To expand on that, researchers at