Tag: may

Pets may protect against suicide in older people

It’s a sad fact that suicide rates among people over 60 are the highest of any age group in Australia, but a new study published today from the University of South Australia has found an unexpected savior—pets. The mere presence of a dog, cat, or even birds can be enough to stop some older people

Certain combinations of cardiovascular drugs may reduce dementia risk

Specific combinations of statins and antihypertensives may also reduce risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new USC study of nearly 700,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The findings suggest that treatments already in use for blood pressure and cholesterol control could reduce the number of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias, researchers said. The study was published

Swings in daily temperature may affect stroke severity

The highs and lows of the daily weather could signal something more important than which outfit to wear: A study from South Korea suggests the more temperatures fluctuate during the summer, the more severe strokes become. Connections between the weather and risk of stroke have been examined for years. To expand on that, researchers at

Why eating yogurt may help lessen the risk of breast cancer

One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria say researchers. Scientists say their idea- as yet unproven—is supported by the available evidence, which is that bacterial induced inflammation is linked to cancer. The paper in the journal Medical Hypotheses is by Lancaster University medical student Auday Marwaha, Professor Jim

China's virus may have been lurking in animals for DECADES

Chinese coronavirus may have been lurking in animals for DECADES before adapting to infect humans, leading expert says amid killer outbreak Sir Jeremy Farrar said the virus isn’t new but has likely adapted to infect humans  Deadly SARS, HIV and Ebola viruses also emerged from an animal source  A total of 325 people have caught

New mechanism may safely prevent and reverse obesity

Obesity, a global epidemic, is a known contributor to several cancers, including breast, colon, and pancreatic. Stopping the obesity epidemic could be a critical aid in preventing and treating numerous cancers. Researchers with the laboratory of Craig Tomlinson, Ph.D., at Dartmouth’s and Dartmouth-Hitchcock’s Norris Cotton Cancer Center have found a critical target in this cause.

Don’t wait to get concussion care; early treatment may mean faster recovery

Early clinical treatment may significantly reduce recovery time following a concussion, according to new research led by the University of Pittsburgh Sports Medicine Concussion Program. The results, published today in JAMA Neurology, suggest delays in seeking treatment can lead to unnecessarily longer recovery. “Our study emphasizes the importance of seeking appropriate, specialized care early on.

Young women still may be getting unnecessary pelvic exams

Pelvic examinations and cervical cancer screenings are no longer recommended for most females under age 21 during routine health visits, but a new study has found that millions of young women are unnecessarily undergoing the tests, which can lead to false-positive testing, over-treatment, anxiety and needless cost. Researchers at UC San Francisco and the Centers

Lingonberry juice may lower elevated blood pressure

An experimental study found that long-term consumption of lingonberry juice lowers high blood pressure and improves the function of blood vessels. At some point in their lives, many people develop elevated blood pressure, even hypertension and functional disturbances in blood vessels related to low-grade inflammation. In addition to drug therapies, nutrition has a key role

Study of intestinal bacteria of insects may reveal strategies for combatting them

More than half the world’s population runs the risk of contracting infectious diseases transmitted by mosquitoes in the next few years. With climate change, these so-called arboviruses—once a problem concentrated in the planet’s tropical regions—appear to also be occurring in places with a temperate climate. “Recent studies indicate that the bacteria present in the intestine

Why exercising outside may be bad for you

Why exercising outside may be bad for you: Poor air quality from pollution could have bigger effect when you breathe more deeply A recent study from South Korea suggests we may be better working out indoors Research said limiting time exercising on busy streets might reduce hair loss Studies found poor air quality may be

Using paracetamol during pregnancy may double risk of ADHD and autism

Study links taking Tylenol in pregnancy to two-fold higher risks of having children with ADHD and autism – but experts say the household painkiller is an unlikely cause Researchers analyzed umbilical cord blood samples of acetaminophen, known by the brand name of Tylenol They then examined diagnoses of ADHD, autism or developmental disabilities Twice as many children

Toxic algal blooms may be key to slowing neurodegenerative disease

Toxic algal blooms can be devastating to natural waterways, robbing them of oxygen, creating dead zones, and sickening people and animals. However, they may also be beneficial, potentially helping combat the progression of neurodegenerative disease, a URI College of Pharmacy study is showing. Assistant Professor of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Matthew Bertin is teaming up

Scientists discover signs a virus may trigger polio-like illness

Is THIS what causes mysterious polio-like illness in kids? Scientists discover signs that a common cold virus may trigger life-threatening paralysis in children Since 2014, nearly 600 people – mostly young children – have been diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis   The mysterious polio-like condition has left young children with mysterious paralysis that becomes life-threatening for some