Tag: may

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities

The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical

Fans may relieve breathlessness associated with advanced cancers

Blowing air from a fan into the face of patients with advanced cancer experiencing breathlessness, and other nonpharmacologic interventions, may offer symptom relief, according to new research directed by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. On the other hand, the investigators found medications, such as opioids, had limited impact in improving breathlessness. In a systematic

India says it may approve vaccine in weeks, outlines plan

India’s health ministry announced Tuesday that some COVID-19 vaccines are likely to receive licenses in the next few weeks and outlined an initial plan to immunize 300 million people. Health officials said three vaccine companies have applied for early approval for emergency use in India: Serum Institute of India, which has been licensed to manufacture

Dr. Fauci Warns That We May Be In For A Rough Winter

While we’re well on our way to a vaccine, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage on. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the White House coronavirus task force and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases warned that a surge of cases is coming this holiday season. “We have to be careful now

Spinal Cord Stimulation May Ease Diabetic Nerve Pain

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2020 — Low-frequency spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be effective for treating painful diabetic neuropathy (DN), according to a study scheduled for presentation at the 19th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting, a meeting of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, held virtually from Nov. 20 to 22. Erika Petersen, M.D.,

CDC: Number of COVID-19 Deaths May Be Underreported

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 — The number of COVID-19-related deaths may be underestimated, according to research published in the Oct. 20 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Lauren M. Rossen, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues assessed trends and demographic patterns in excess

Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug, Upadacitinib (Rinvoq), May Help Ease Tough-to-Treat Cases

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 — A recently approved rheumatoid arthritis medication appears to be an effective second-line therapy when biologic treatments start to fail, a new clinical trial reports. Arthritis sufferers treated with upadacitinib had a significantly greater reduction in their symptoms and disease activity than people treated with a standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD),

Doing good may make people look better

Giving is good for you. For years, researchers have been finding that people who support charities or volunteer for causes can benefit from being generous. For example, they might learn new things, meet new people or make others whom they care about happier. Researchers have also found that giving may make the givers themselves happier,

ECT May Reduce Suicide Risk in Patients With Bipolar Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 — Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may help treat features of bipolar depression, including suicidality, according to study results partially published earlier this year in the The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry and presented at the annual congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, held virtually from Sept. 12 to 15. Giulio E.

Certain Cancer Treatments May Heighten Danger From COVID-19

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2020 — People with cancer are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. Now, a preliminary study suggests that certain cancer therapies may heighten those odds even further. Researchers found that of 3,600 U.S. cancer patients who contracted COVID-19, the highest risk of death was among those who’d received cancer treatment within the

The hormone glucagon may be a warning light for diabetes

Up to one in four Danes has an unhealthy accumulation of fat in the liver, also known as fatty liver. Fatty liver is rarely the cause of symptoms in itself, but people with fatty liver have an increased risk of developing diabetes. Exactly how the two diseases are linked has, however, so far been unknown.

COVID-19 may have been in LA before CHRISTMAS, study suggests

Coronavirus may have been sending people in Los Angeles to ERs before Christmas and circulating in the county months earlier than the first reported case, study suggests UCLA researchers analyzed more than 10 million patient records for visits to Los  Angeles hospitals between December and February  They saw 50% increase for visits for ‘coughing’ compared

Early therapy for rheumatoid arthritis may slow heart disease

(HealthDay)—Disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment also cuts cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. Sven Plein, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, and colleagues randomly assigned 81 patients with early RA to either

Genetic background may affect adaptions to aging

How we adapt to aging late in life may be genetically influenced, according to a study led by a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside. The research, published in Aging Cell, has implications for how epigenetic factors relate to aging. Epigenesis is a process in which chemicals attached to DNA control its activity. Epigenetic

Frequently used serology test may not detect antibodies that could confirm protection against reinfection of COVID-19

Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while