Tag: may

Inflammation protection may be critical to treating multiple sclerosis

Prolonging a cellular defense response to inflammation could help regenerate the protective coating of axons that is degraded in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in eLife. There are currently no FDA-approved drugs that have been shown to effectively regenerate this coating, called myelin. This new strategy could

How oral health may affect your heart, brain and risk of death

Dental cavities could significantly increase the risk of a life-threatening stroke from bleeding in the brain, according to new research. Past studies have shown a link between gum infection and stroke, but few studies have looked into what role dental cavities might play. In the new study, researchers looked specifically at cavities and intracerebral stroke,

Study find progesterone therapy may improve COVID-19 outcomes for men

COVID-19 disproportionately affects men compared with women, raising the possibility that a hormone like progesterone may improve clinical outcomes for certain hospitalized men with the disease. New research from Cedars-Sinai published online in the journal Chest supports this hypothesis. The pilot clinical trial, involving 40 men, is believed to be the first published study to

Vaccine-induced antibodies may be less effective against several new SARS-CoV-2 variants: study

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, has mutated throughout the pandemic. New variants of the virus have arisen throughout the world, including variants that might possess increased ability to spread or evade the immune system. Such variants have been identified in California, Denmark, the U.K., South Africa and Brazil/Japan. Understanding how well the COVID-19 vaccines

Anticancer drug may improve outcome for severe COVID-19 patients

Treating severe COVID-19 patients with the anticancer drug bevacizumab may reduce mortality and speed up recovery, according to a small clinical study in Italy and China that was led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden between February and April 2020. On average, blood oxygen levels, body temperature and inflammatory markers significantly improved in patients

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities

The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical

Fans may relieve breathlessness associated with advanced cancers

Blowing air from a fan into the face of patients with advanced cancer experiencing breathlessness, and other nonpharmacologic interventions, may offer symptom relief, according to new research directed by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators. On the other hand, the investigators found medications, such as opioids, had limited impact in improving breathlessness. In a systematic

India says it may approve vaccine in weeks, outlines plan

India’s health ministry announced Tuesday that some COVID-19 vaccines are likely to receive licenses in the next few weeks and outlined an initial plan to immunize 300 million people. Health officials said three vaccine companies have applied for early approval for emergency use in India: Serum Institute of India, which has been licensed to manufacture

Dr. Fauci Warns That We May Be In For A Rough Winter

While we’re well on our way to a vaccine, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage on. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the White House coronavirus task force and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases warned that a surge of cases is coming this holiday season. “We have to be careful now

Spinal Cord Stimulation May Ease Diabetic Nerve Pain

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2020 — Low-frequency spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be effective for treating painful diabetic neuropathy (DN), according to a study scheduled for presentation at the 19th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting, a meeting of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, held virtually from Nov. 20 to 22. Erika Petersen, M.D.,

CDC: Number of COVID-19 Deaths May Be Underreported

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 — The number of COVID-19-related deaths may be underestimated, according to research published in the Oct. 20 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Lauren M. Rossen, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues assessed trends and demographic patterns in excess

Newer Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug, Upadacitinib (Rinvoq), May Help Ease Tough-to-Treat Cases

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 — A recently approved rheumatoid arthritis medication appears to be an effective second-line therapy when biologic treatments start to fail, a new clinical trial reports. Arthritis sufferers treated with upadacitinib had a significantly greater reduction in their symptoms and disease activity than people treated with a standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD),

Doing good may make people look better

Giving is good for you. For years, researchers have been finding that people who support charities or volunteer for causes can benefit from being generous. For example, they might learn new things, meet new people or make others whom they care about happier. Researchers have also found that giving may make the givers themselves happier,

ECT May Reduce Suicide Risk in Patients With Bipolar Depression

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30, 2020 — Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may help treat features of bipolar depression, including suicidality, according to study results partially published earlier this year in the The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry and presented at the annual congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, held virtually from Sept. 12 to 15. Giulio E.

Certain Cancer Treatments May Heighten Danger From COVID-19

TUESDAY, Sept. 22, 2020 — People with cancer are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. Now, a preliminary study suggests that certain cancer therapies may heighten those odds even further. Researchers found that of 3,600 U.S. cancer patients who contracted COVID-19, the highest risk of death was among those who’d received cancer treatment within the