Tag: not

Most Americans are not getting enough fiber in our diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S. “These findings should remind

FDA says do not drink ‘Real Water’ brand alkaline water

(HealthDay)—As an investigation into a hepatitis outbreak in Nevada associated with Real Water brand alkaline water continues, no one should drink, cook, serve, or sell the water, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday. As of April 26, there had been 11 probable cases and one suspected case of acute nonviral hepatitis in Nevada.

Why your social media habit is probably not an addiction

Social media apps are useful sources of information. They help us catch up with the activities of friends, news, current affairs, government COVID updates and the latest happenings in celebrity and sport. But during the pandemic, you may have felt you spend too much time on social media. On occasion you may have seen the

WHO says not to use ivermectin on COVID-19 patients

The World Health Organization said Wednesday that ivermectin—touted by some on social media as a COVID-19 “miracle cure”—should not be used to treat coronavirus patients. In response to the swirl of claims around the cheap anti-parasite drug, the WHO issued guidelines saying ivermectin should only be used on COVID-19 patients in clinical trial settings. The

WHO says not to use ivermectin on COVID-19 patients

The World Health Organization said Wednesday that ivermectin—touted by some on social media as a COVID-19 “miracle cure”—should not be used to treat coronavirus patients. In response to the swirl of claims around the cheap anti-parasite drug, the WHO issued guidelines saying ivermectin should only be used on COVID-19 patients in clinical trial settings. The

AstraZeneca vaccine not to blame for Austria death: EMA

Europe’s medicines watchdog said Wednesday a preliminary probe showed that a batch of AstraZeneca vaccines used in Austria was likely not to blame for the death of a nurse who received a jab. Austria on Monday announced it would stop using doses from the batch, made by the British-Swedish firm with Oxford University, after the

Not to be sniffed at: Agony of post-COVID-19 loss of smell

The doctor slid a miniature camera into the patient’s right nostril, making her whole nose glow red with its bright miniature light. “Tickles a bit, eh?” he asked as he rummaged around her nasal passages, the discomfort causing tears to well in her eyes and roll down her cheeks. The patient, Gabriella Forgione, wasn’t complaining.

Chrissy Teigen: I'm 'Full of Regret' Over Not Seeing Late Son Jack's Face

Five months after her pregnancy loss, Chrissy Teigen misses her late son, Jack, “so much.” Chrissy Teigen and John Legend’s Family Album The Cravings author, 35, shared throwback photos on Thursday, February 4, from her husband John Legend’s “Wild” music video shoot where she revealed her pregnancy news. https://www.instagram.com/p/CK5cHOFB3bb/ A post shared by chrissy teigen

North-south divide, not age, linked to hearing loss

An increase of over 10% in the prevalence of hearing loss in the English over 50s may not be age-related, a new study by University of Manchester researchers has shown. Instead the study, published in BMC Geriatrics, found hearing loss could be linked to social and lifestyle differences in the north and south of the

Job interest not a big predictor of job satisfaction

Most people closing in on a high school or college degree, and even those casting their career fates without a diploma, at some point take an interest assessment to help determine how their interests relate to different jobs. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, The Occupational Information Network’s (O*NET) My Next Move website, which

Single gene disorders not so simple after all

Traditionally, geneticists divide disorders into “simple,” where a single gene mutation causes disease, or complex, where mutations in many genes contribute modest amounts. A new study suggests that the truth is somewhere in between. For many years, scientists studying patient genomes have gained glimpses of genetic “burden” or additional genetic variation that contributes to the

Frequently used serology test may not detect antibodies that could confirm protection against reinfection of COVID-19

Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while

Posthospital follow-up visits for bronchiolitis may not be needed

(HealthDay)—As-needed follow-up is an equally effective posthospitalization follow-up strategy when compared with a scheduled follow-up visit for young children hospitalized for bronchiolitis, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Pediatrics. Eric R. Coon, M.D., from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and colleagues randomly assigned children younger than 24 months