Tag: Researchers

Cancer researchers discover new salivary gland

Researchers at the Netherlands Cancer Institute have discovered salivary glands in a previously unknown location. This is potentially great news for patients with head and neck tumors: Radiation oncologists will now be able to circumvent this area to avoid potential complications. The research is forthcoming in Radiotherapy & Oncology. Advanced technology allows scientists to visualize

Researchers collaborate on universal antibody test for COVID-19

Researchers with the U.S. Army Futures Command are part of a team that tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels, resulting in a process that is faster, easier and less expensive to use on a large scale. Their method holds promise for accurately identifying potential donors who have the best chance of helping infected

Researchers launch COVID-19 Global Pandemic App Watch

Contact-tracing and exposure-notification apps are a new technology rapidly developed and launched to respond to the COVID-19 global health crisis. The development of such applications is placing governments, corporations, and citizens around the world into an ongoing ethical design experiment resulting in potentially life-saving outcomes but also potential risks. During the summer of 2020, design

Researchers warn of COVID-19 and flu ‘twindemic’

Even as the first wave of the pandemic still roils, fears are rising of a second crush of COVID-19 infections. But because the novel coronavirus is, well, novel, no one can yet say if that will happen. One thing is certain, though, another viral wave is coming: flu season. Influenza season occurs during the cold

Researchers study if nerve cells evolved to talk to microbes

Various diseases of the digestive tract, for example severe intestinal inflammation in humans, are closely linked to disturbances in the natural mobility of the intestine. What role the microbiome—i.e. the natural microbial community colonizing the digestive tract—plays in these rhythmic contractions of the intestine, also known as peristalsis, is currently the subject of intensive research.

Researchers identify possible immune targets in the SARS-CoV-2 genome

Otago researchers studying the COVID-19 virus (SARS-2) have discovered potential target points on its genome, which may contribute to future treatments for the virus. While their laboratory was locked down during the Level 4 period, Ph.D. student Ali Hosseini and Professor Alex McLellan from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology worked from their homes to

Researchers identify ‘hot spots’ for developing lymphatic vessels

When an embryo develops, a wide variety of proteins and enzymes trigger a series of biochemical reactions. The development of the lymphatic vasculature is crucially dependent on one specific protein—the growth factor VEGF-C. In order to become biologically active and to initiate downstream signaling events, the protein must first undergo processing steps. Thus far it

Researchers propose direct PET image reconstruction network

Positron emission tomography (PET), an advanced medical imaging technique, has been widely used in various clinical applications, including tumor detection and neurologic disorders. Reducing the radiotracer dose could decrease the patient’s radiation exposure in PET imaging. However, it could also increase the noise and then affect the image quality. Researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of

Researchers find minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic Achilles tendon disorder

A minimally invasive procedure to treat a common foot and ankle disorder can reduce pain, recovery time, and postsurgery complications while improving functional outcomes, according to a report published in the journal Foot and Ankle Surgery. The procedure treats insertional Achilles tendinopathy, a common and chronic orthopedic disorder in which patients experience pain at the

Researchers identify starting point for designing drugs that cure clostridium difficile

A newly published paper in PNAS details a research breakthrough that provides a promising starting point for scientists to create drugs that can cure C. diff—a virulent health care-associated infection that causes severe diarrhea, nausea, internal bleeding, and potentially death. The bacteria affects roughly half-a-million Americans and causes nearly 15,000 deaths in the U.S. annually.

Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine

Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that adding a specific immune molecule to a rabies vaccine can boost its efficacy. Previous studies have suggested that the