Tag: save

How changing vaccine schedules can save costs and lives: Findings from South Africa

In 2005, before most low- and middle-income countries started vaccinating children routinely for pneumococcal disease, it caused approximately 1.5 million deaths worldwide annually. About 700,000 to 1 million of these deaths were in children under five years. Pneumococcal disease occurs when Streptococcus pneumoniae invades a normally sterile area of the body, causing meningitis, pneumonia, septicaemia

WHO, IMF say saving lives ‘prerequisite’ to save jobs

Credit: CC0 Public Domain The WHO and IMF chiefs insisted Friday that saving lives was a “prerequisite” to saving livelihoods in the coronavirus pandemic—a crisis they called “one of humanity’s darkest hours”. World Health Organization director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and International Monetary Fund managing director Kristalina Georgieva said getting the COVID-19 virus under control first

Mother, 35, risks her life to save her baby

Mother, 35, risks her life to save her baby by undergoing dangerous transplant surgery to donate a piece of her liver Firefighter Jonathan Roscoe is used to saving lives, but it’s his wife, Danielle, who has saved the life of their son Otis by donating part of her liver, after doctors warned he would die

Treating stroke patients just 15 minutes earlier can save lives

Initiating stroke treatment just 15 minutes faster can save lives and prevent disability, according to a new UCLA-led study, published today in JAMA. The research also determined that busier hospitals—those that treat more than 450 people for stroke each year—have better outcomes than those that treat fewer than 400 stroke patients per year. Researchers at

Human protein produced in CHO-cells can save donor blood

Alpha-1-antitrypsin is a protein produced by the liver. The protein gets secreted to the blood stream, where it circulates the body to protect the lungs. However, some people are born with genetic disorders that hinders production of this protein. These patients can suffer from decreased lung function, liver diseases and shortness of breath. In the

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

A blow to the chest can have highly contrasting effects. For instance, some baseball players have died after being hit in the chest by a baseball, while patients undergoing fatal cardiac tachyarrhythmias have been saved by an appropriately timed thump to the chest. Scientists know that such blows create rapid strains on heart tissue, but

Heroic dog guides ambulance to save his unconscious owner

One spirited golden retriever is being praised as a hero on Chinese social media after valiantly guiding an ambulance to locate his owner, who had fallen unconscious. (Newsflare) One spirited golden retriever is being praised as a hero on Chinese social media after valiantly guiding an ambulance to locate his owner, who had fallen unconscious.

The Right Way to Save Oil After Frying a Turkey

Frying a turkey isn’t really the traditional method of cooking a Thanksgiving bird, but it does give it an awesome crispy skin and juiciness through the roof. Still, a lot of us seem to avoid the whole deep-frying situation because of the terrifying tales of Thanksgiving Day explosions — and the fact that the process requires

EVE SIMMONS says we don’t need a meat tax

Save our bacon! EVE SIMMONS says we don’t need a meat tax as she exposes another diet myth Scientists at Oxford University say 6,000 Britons could be spared an early grave if red meat products including bacon, steak and sausages cost 70 per cent more.  Their analysis of evidence linking red meat to diabetes, cancer

Peer-led education helps physicians save time with EHRs

(HealthDay)—A peer-based education program can improve the efficiency of electronic health record (EHR) use, according to an article published in the American Medical Association’s AMA Wire. An educational program called Kaiser Permanente HealthConnect Essentials (KP HCE), which was designed to maximize the effectiveness of physicians’ use of EHRs, was established after problems were reported by

Why seeing the same doctor every time could save your life

Why seeing the same doctor every time could save your life: Patients are open about symptoms, trusting of medical advice and inclined prescriptions from familiar GP Researchers from University of Exeter Medical School looked at 1.4m patients Findings showed patients were more likely to die if they used different doctors  One US study found nearly a

Improved CPR training could save more lives, research finds

More people will survive cardiac arrest if resuscitation course designers and instructors address shortcomings in educational offerings, new research shows. A new statement released today by the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease, in its journal Circulation, indicates standardized online and in-person courses are falling short and

UV light treatment can save millions while helping patients

Treating severe skin conditions with UV light rather than creams, pills and injections could save the NHS millions of pounds while improving patient outcomes, according to a new University of Dundee study. Dr. John Foerster and colleagues from the University’s School of Medicine found the annual per-patient cost of filtered UV light treatment, known as

Simple drug packaging change could save toddlers’ lives

(HealthDay)—As America’s opioid crisis continues, too many toddlers are accidentally overdosing on narcotic medicines. But a new study suggests that better packaging might curb the problem. Among kids under the age of 6, single-dose packaging prompted a 79 percent decrease in the number of unintentional exposures to a narcotic called buprenorphine. The medication is given

Changing how blood pressure is measured will save lives

Traditional methods of testing for high-blood pressure are no longer adequate and risk missing vital health signs, which can lead to premature death, a study co-led by UCL has found. The research, the largest ever cohort study of its kind, published in the New England Journal for Medicine, assessed 63,000 doctors’ patients, who had their