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Mosquito-borne viruses linked to stroke

A deadly combination of two mosquito-borne viruses may be a trigger for stroke, new research published in the The Lancet Neurology has found. University of Liverpool researchers and Brazilian collaborators have been investigating the link between neurological disease and infection with the viruses Zika and chikungunya. These viruses, which mostly circulate in the tropics, cause

No benefit from drug used to reduce heart disease in kidney patients

Following a large-scale clinical trial, researchers have found that lanthanum carbonate does not reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease developing in patients with chronic kidney disease. The drug is routinely prescribed to patients with chronic kidney disease to help reduce the risk of both bone disease and cardiovascular disease, with cardiovascular disease the most common

Ensuring an ethical path to a ‘warp speed’ vaccine

A vaccine for COVID-19 is seen by many—rightly or wrongly—as the finish line for the pandemic, the shot that will mark the resumption of our normal lives. Yet recent polls suggest that a significant fraction of Americans may opt not to get a vaccine when one becomes available, or are at least wary of getting

Global trial to test whether MMR vaccine protects front-line health-care workers against COVID-19

An international research network of physicians and scientists is launching a clinical trial to evaluate whether the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) can protect front-line health-care workers against infection from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The trial aims to enroll up to 30,000 health-care workers globally. Washington University School of Medicine in

Research team pairs 3-D bioprinting and computer modeling to examine cancer spread in blood vessels

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have paired 3-D-printed, living human brain vasculature with advanced computational flow simulations to better understand tumor cell attachment to blood vessels, the first step in secondary tumor formation during cancer metastasis. The unique approach, developed with outside collaborators, lays the foundation for developing a predictive capability that can help

Many Americans struggling to afford health care in pandemic

More than two in five working-age U.S. adults didn’t have stable health insurance in the first half of 2020, while more than one-third struggled with medical bills, according to a new survey. “The survey shows a persistent vulnerability among U.S. working-age adults in their ability to afford coverage and health care. That vulnerability could worsen

Ventilators could be adapted to help two COVID-19 patients at once

As the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic approached, governments feared there would not be enough ventilators—machines that ‘breathe’ for patients when they cannot do so themselves—to help all those who needed one. Now, researchers from King’s College London and Imperial College London have developed a theoretical model for how one ventilator could be used

Genetic background may affect adaptions to aging

How we adapt to aging late in life may be genetically influenced, according to a study led by a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside. The research, published in Aging Cell, has implications for how epigenetic factors relate to aging. Epigenesis is a process in which chemicals attached to DNA control its activity. Epigenetic

Spanish region imposes smoking ban to curb virus spread

A ban on smoking on streets and restaurant terraces when social-distancing cannot be guaranteed came into effect Thursday in Spain’s northwestern region of Galicia, with other areas mulling similar restrictions. Under a law approved by the regional government of Galicia late on Wednesday, smoking in public is not allowed if it is not possible to