Tag: vaccine

Scientists are already working on a coronavirus vaccine

Scientists are already working on a coronavirus vaccine – but warn it will likely be years before there is a shot to prevent the contagious illness which has so far killed 17 people A new coronavirus has sickened more than 500 people worldwide and killed 17 in China, where it originated  The first US case

Researchers develop a faster, stronger rabies vaccine

Every year, more than 59,000 people around the world die of rabies and there remains no cheap and easy vaccine regimen to prevent the disease in humans. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that adding a specific immune molecule to a rabies vaccine can boost its efficacy. Previous studies have suggested that the

Advance in search for new Clostridioides difficile vaccine

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the hunt for a new vaccine for killer hospital bug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff). University of Exeter researchers first identified a gene in C. diff responsible for producing a protein that aids in binding the bacteria to the gut of its victims. In collaboration with researchers at Paris-SUD University,

We have a vaccine for hepatitis B, but we still need a cure

Hepatitis B is blood-borne virus that packs a punch. Worldwide, more than 1.3 billion people have been infected with hepatitis B, and 257 million people have developed a life-long infection. This includes 240,000 Australians, many of whom are Indigenous. Globally, transmission most commonly occurs from mother to baby or in early life. But it’s possible

Herpes vaccine is a winner in animals. Next up: Testing on humans.

For nearly a century, efforts to develop a vaccine to prevent genital herpes have failed. At least nine prospects, including several that made it to late-stage human testing, have flopped in the last decade. Considering that history, University of Pennsylvania scientists are justifiably excited about their vaccine against the herpes simplex 2 virus, even though

Survey: many U.S. adults not planning to get flu vaccine

(HealthDay)—Many U.S. adults, including some at the highest risk for the flu and pneumonia, do not plan to get preventive vaccines, according to a survey conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago on behalf of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. The survey was conducted between Aug. 15 and 18, 2019, to better understand

Vaccine against deadly superbug Klebsiella effective in mice

Scientists have produced and tested, in mice, a vaccine that protects against a worrisome superbug: a hypervirulent form of the bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae. And they’ve done so by genetically manipulating a harmless form of E. coli, report researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and VaxNewMo, a St. Louis-based startup. Klebsiella pneumoniae causes

New vaccine targets killer disease tuberculosis

There is only one existing vaccine for TB and it is not effective in adults. Researchers at the Centenary Institute and University of Sydney will next test their new vaccine in clinical trials with humans. Australian medical researchers from the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney have successfully developed and tested on mice a

Recommendations developed for japanese encephalitis vaccine

(HealthDay)—In the July 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, recommendations are presented for use of the Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine. Susan L. Hills, M.B.B.S., from the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the CDC in Fort Collins, Colorado, and colleagues summarize the

California bill to tighten vaccine exemptions moves forward

A bill that would tighten control over vaccination exemptions for children in California was sent by state senators to the Assembly on Wednesday. Under the measure, state public health officials, not local doctors, would have the authority to decide which children qualify for medical vaccination exemptions before attending school, the Associated Press reported. The change

Governments urged to adopt compensation for rare vaccine injury

Research led by The University of Western Australia has found that that most countries with mandatory childhood vaccination policies don’t have no-fault vaccine injury compensation schemes to care for rare victims of vaccines. Lead researcher Katie Attwell, from UWA’s School of Social Sciences, said no-fault compensation schemes enabled governments to address unintended consequences of vaccination.

New York City's mandatory measles vaccine orders trigger lawsuit from parents

Is the anti-vaccination movement to blame for the near-record number of measles cases? NEW YORK CITY – Five parents filed a lawsuit Monday against the New York City Department of Health claiming the city overstepped its authority by making vaccinations mandatory in neighborhoods experiencing the measles outbreak. The parents claimed last week’s orders violated their “children’s

Immune responses in Ebola survivors 2 years after infection provide clues for vaccine development

Scientists have discovered that 2 years after infection, West African Ebola survivors exhibit memory immune responses—including specific T cells against Ebola virus. They believe their discovery opens up the possibility of improving Ebola vaccines by boosting key immune cells needed for long-lasting protective immunity. The new research is being presented at this year’s European Congress

Measles Outbreak Spurs Vaccination Surge in Anti-Vaxxer Hotspot

Weeks after a hotspot for anti-vaxxers turned into a hotspot for measles infections, vaccination rates have surged in the area, according to news reports. Last month, following 50 confirmed cases and 11 suspected cases of the measles, Clark County, Washington, declared a public health emergency. Now, residents of the area are scrambling for vaccinations, according

Most Bills Enacted Into Law Limit Vaccine Exemptions

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 — Most proposed bills in state legislatures from 2011 to 2017 sought to expand access to immunization exemptions, but the majority of bills enacted into law limited exemptions, according to a study published online Nov. 29 in the American Journal of Public Health. Neal D. Goldstein, Ph.D., from Drexel University Dornsife