Tag: water

Migration can promote or inhibit cooperation between individuals: Mathematical model sheds new light on conflict between group interests and individual interests

A new mathematical analysis suggests that migration can generate patterns in the spatial distribution of individuals that promote cooperation and allow populations to thrive, in spite of the threat of exploitation. Felix Funk and Christoph Hauert of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. Cooperation between individuals is necessary

How to Protect Yourself From Unsafe Drinking Water

You know about Flint, Michigan, but rattle off any number of other cities—Ithaca, Joliet, Chicago, Minneapolis, or even your hometown—and you wouldn’t second-guess drinking water from the tap. But maybe you should. The problem with your water Ithaca, New York, had problems with a new disinfection system that produced too-high levels of chlorites in its

The Most Epic Summer Water Toys

Finally: School is out for summer! But now what? Well, kids may want to hit the snooze button a few extra times each morning. And/or, you know, they might want to just stay glued to their iPad for hours on end (no surprise there). But it’s up to parents to remind those little lazybones that

Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh: Some solutions are 100 times cheaper than others, costing as little as $1 per person

In what has been called “the largest mass poisoning of a population in history,” some 40 million people in Bangladesh are drinking water that contains unsafe levels of arsenic. The naturally occurring element seeps into groundwater reached by shallow wells, and from there it has a huge impact on the health and lives of Bangladeshis;

Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure

Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal. “People drinking water from private wells, which are not regulated, need

Drinking water? There’s an app for that

The human body is well equipped to maintain an adequate level of hydration through the various biological feedback control mechanisms of homeostasis. However, this regulation relies on an adequate supply of water. While there is much mythology surrounding how many glasses of water we each must drink daily to stay healthy. Many people sip at

Is all well with your drinking water?

(HealthDay)—More than 15 million homes in the United States get their water from private wells, according to federal estimates. While the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates public drinking water, people with private wells need to check their water themselves, along with other maintenance steps. This is especially important if you’re thinking about having a baby.

Photographer reveals the beauty of water births

The beauty of water births: Incredible picture gallery taken by a photographer inspired by the death of her first child Natalie Lennard, had a son who died immediately because of a rare condition She was inspired to create the a gallery representing women’s water births Ms Lennard says there needs to be ‘more positive and

Women Who Practice This Daily Habit Get Fewer UTIs

If you’re one of the millions of women who get UTIs on the reg, listen up: you probably haven’t been drinking enough water. According to a new study, staying hydrated is the key to keeping your nether regions infection-free. Researchers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine recruited 140 women who suffer from

12 health benefits of lime water

The body needs water to survive and drinking enough is crucial for maintaining optimal health. Water ensures the human body is adequately hydrated. People stay hydrated by drinking liquids and consuming foods with high water content. The amount of water a person needs to drink varies according to: their age their sex the amount of

10 Ways to Supercharge Your Water This Summer

There’s no denying water is good for us. Good for our hair, skin, digestive system and immune system, not to mention water wards off all the ills that come with dehydration in the summer (hello, dehydration headache.) There’s some debate over how much we really need to drink — that whole eight-glasses-a-day thing might be

CDC IDs outbreak trends tied to treated recreational water

(HealthDay)—Outbreaks associated with treated recreational water with confirmed infectious etiology are usually caused by Cryptosporidium, Legionella, or Pseudomonas, according to research published in the May 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Michele C. Hlavsa, M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues describe 493 outbreaks