Category: Health News

New York City's mandatory measles vaccine orders trigger lawsuit from parents

Is the anti-vaccination movement to blame for the near-record number of measles cases? NEW YORK CITY – Five parents filed a lawsuit Monday against the New York City Department of Health claiming the city overstepped its authority by making vaccinations mandatory in neighborhoods experiencing the measles outbreak. The parents claimed last week’s orders violated their “children’s

Mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma identified: A conserved stress response mechanism leads to BRAF inhibitor resistance through AP-1 activation

Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of skin cancer, but recent advances in targeted therapies have improved the prognosis for many patients. Unfortunately, for some patients these positive outcomes are not long lasting, due to the development of drug resistance and tumor recurrence. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which

Cognitive functioning does not predict weight-loss outcome for adolescents: Adolescents with cognitive impairments and intellectual disabilities have similar weight-loss trajectories to peers after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

Young people with cognitive impairments and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, have similar weight-loss trajectories to those with typical cognitive function after bariatric surgery, according to a new study in Pediatrics authored by psychologists at Children’s National Health System. The study is the first to look at post-surgical outcomes for this subgroup of adolescent bariatric

Worldwide measles cases almost quadruple in first quarter of 2019: WHO

Geneva: The number of measles cases worldwide nearly quadrupled in the first quarter of 2019 to 112,163 against the same period last year, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday, citing provisional data. The is no scientific evidence to support anti-vaccination claims that measles, mumps and rubella vaccines cause autism.Credit:AP Higher rates of the

The history of humanity in your face

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat, breath, see, and communicate. But how did the modern human face evolve to look the way it does?

Heavy periods? You might have an undiagnosed bleeding disorder

About 30 per cent of all women report heavy menstrual periods at some point during their reproductive years. Up to 15 per cent of these have an underlying bleeding disorder and yet most have never been diagnosed, leaving thousands of women to suffer from a treatable problem. As a hematologist and clinician scientist at Queen’s

Sustainability of plant ingredients as fishmeal substitutes

Substituting fishmeal in aquaculture feeds with plant ingredients may not be as beneficial for the environment as many predict, according to new research from an international team of experts. Manufacturers of commercial fish feed are increasingly substituting fishmeal — a powder made from fish — with crop-based ingredients in a move driven by economic incentives

How a woman in Arizona woke up with British accent

Rare syndrome causes woman to wake up with a foreign accent Medical Mysteries and Marvels: An American woman in Arizona goes to sleep with a headache and wakes up with a British accent. Michelle Myers is a woman from Arizona who’s never left the country. But although Myers used to speak like any other American,

Which is the good oil? Health star ratings fight

Public health experts and Woolworths oppose a change to the health star ratings that would signal olive oil was not as healthy as canola and sunflower oils. The health star ratings, the government-backed system that assigns food a health score out of five to guide consumers to make healthier choices, are not currently displayed on

Violent attacks in England and Wales are becoming LESS common

Violent attacks in England and Wales are becoming LESS common according to A&E data, as figures reveal they have dropped by 41% since 2010 Researchers analysed attendance data from dozens of A&E departments They estimated that 187,584 people sought help for violent injuries in 2018 In comparison, 3,162 fewer people were treated in the previous

92% of Mount Sinai patients engage when prescribed an app

Anyone paying attention is aware of the app explosion happening in healthcare today while questions persist about just how useful so many digital therapeutics actually are in a clinical setting. Work at Mount Sinai, however, is showcasing the promise of digital tools and apps. Mount Sinai started by constructing a patient design group while developing a

Yes, You Really Can Achieve Multiple Orgasms

For some women, having multiple orgasms is the sexual Mount Everest of pleasure. However, Stella Harris, Intimacy Educator, Sex Coach, and author of Tongue Tied: Untangling Communication in Sex, Kink, and Relationships, tells SheKnows that multiple orgasms can be a bit of a misnomer. “The orgasms don’t necessarily happen one right after the other,” she

New imaging technique reveals ‘burst’ of activity before cell death: Novel dual-PWS platform reveals connections between macromolecular structure and dynamic movement in the chromatin within eukaryotic cells

Studying the movement of tiny cells is no small task. For chromatin, the group of DNA, RNA, and protein macromolecules packed within our genome, motion is an integral part of its active role as a regulator of how our genes get expressed or repressed. “Understanding macromolecular motion is critical, but scientists know very little about

Case of tick-borne relapsing fever in Mexico

Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever (TBRF) is a recurring fever caused by exposure to infected Borrelia bacteria. Several cases have been reported in Mexico, but the disease gets little attention. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases describe the details of an additional case of TBRF in Sonora, Mexico in 2012. On January 27, 2012, a

Population health: A rapidly evolving discipline in US academic medicine

Leaders from department-level initiatives across the U.S. weigh in on how academic medicine is embracing population health and the opportunities med schools have to make an impact, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Network Open. Produced by a working group of chairs from nine population-focused medical school departments, the qualitative study reviewed areas