Category: Health News

Most Bills Enacted Into Law Limit Vaccine Exemptions

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 — Most proposed bills in state legislatures from 2011 to 2017 sought to expand access to immunization exemptions, but the majority of bills enacted into law limited exemptions, according to a study published online Nov. 29 in the American Journal of Public Health. Neal D. Goldstein, Ph.D., from Drexel University Dornsife

Prolonged Brain Connections Seen in Adults With Autism

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 — Connections between different areas of the brain are sustained longer than usual in people with autism, perhaps explaining some of their symptoms, a new study suggests. It’s possible these prolonged connections make it difficult for the brain to switch from one activity to another, the researchers said. “People with autism

Soil compound fights chronic wasting disease

A major compound in soil organic matter degrades chronic wasting disease prions and decreases infectivity in mice, according to a study published November 29 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Judd Aiken of the University of Alberta, and colleagues. Chronic wasting disease is an environmentally transmissible, fatal prion disease affecting free-ranging deer, moose, elk

Medications That Can Change the Color of Your Urine

    Medications that can turn urine orange Isoniazid, an antibiotic used for the treatment of tuberculosis Sulfasalazine, an anti-inflammatory used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis Riboflavin (also known as vitamin B2), a vitamin included in many over-the-counter multivitamins   Medications that can turn urine brown Metronidazole (Flagyl), an antibiotic used to treat bacterial vaginosis, C. diff diarrhea and

When penis enlargement goes wrong

When penis enlargement goes wrong: Scientists reveal the dangers of girth-increasing procedures which can cause gangrene, deformity and other ‘devastating complications’ A study of 11 men by California scientists revealed horrifying complications One 21-year-old injected his own penis with silicone and it became infected While a 48-year-old had fat injected into his member but it

What’s Best for Babies With Recurring Ear Infections

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 — Infant ear infections can be a source of frustration for parents and babies alike. But there are steps to lessen them and, when they do occur, “less is more” is a better way to treat them. A typical infection can begin with bacterial growth. Inflammation can lead to fluid buildup

Organ donation: the number is rising again

For the first time in years, in Germany, there are more organ donors. Although the year is not over yet, the German organ transplantation Foundation (DSO) for 2018, more donors than in the whole of last year. Also, the number of procured organs increased. The DSO that have been counted by mid-November of this year,

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 — Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends. Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer appear to benefit from regular mammograms as much as women in their 40s

7 Things Therapists Wish Their Clients Knew

Myths about therapy and therapists abound in American culture. The therapeutic process is often shrouded in mystery and misconceptions, and there are things therapists really wish their clients knew. Stigmas about mental illness and what actually happens in a therapist’s office can undermine a person’s healing process — while also sometimes deterring people from getting the

YouTube fueling prostate myths: 77% of top 150 videos contain errors

YouTube fueling prostate myths: 77% of 150 most watched videos ‘have factual errors’ There are well over half a million videos about prostate cancer on YouTube  More than 77 percent of the videos included incorrect or biased information about the disease About half of the videos did not describe the recommended ‘shared decision-making’ doctors and

To predict the future, the brain uses two clocks: In music, sports and other activities, we calculate movement in two different parts of the brain

That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello’s “Havana” is struck. That’s anticipatory timing. One type relies on memories from past experiences. The other on rhythm. Both are critical to our ability

Stress-induced effects on heart blood flow differ for men versus women

Some patients with coronary artery disease have inadequate blood flow to the heart muscle during periods of mental/emotional stress. This condition — called “mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia” (MSIMI) — is related to the severity of plaque buildup in the coronary arteries in men but not women, reports a study in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral