New tuberculosis drug may shorten treatment time for patients

A new experimental antibiotic for tuberculosis has been shown to be more effective against TB than isoniazid, a decades-old drug which is currently one of the standard treatments. In mouse studies, the new drug showed a much lower tendency to develop resistance, and it remains in the tissues where the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside for

More is better when coordinating with others

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Imperial College London and the University of Tokyo have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups. The researchers used robotic interfaces to test coordination in groups of two, three and four partners, and found that performance was improving with every additional group member. The researchers believe

New dangerous side effects with the popular painkiller Ibuprofen found

Ibuprofen for men is more dangerous than for women? Ibuprofen is one of the most popular and commonly used pain relievers. It is available without prescription and is used against numerous ailments. Is unthinkingly dealing with the pain means? An international research team uncovered recently, previously unknown side effects during long-term use. Apparently, the drug

Ebola death toll tops 500 in DRC with nearly 100 CHILDREN killed

Ebola death toll tops 500 in Democratic Republic of the Congo with nearly 100 CHILDREN killed by the devastating virus The second worst outbreak in history has ravaged the country since August Expected to continue into middle of the year at least, according to aid workers Thousands of vaccinations administered to neighbouring countries on high

Rates of Diabetes Screening High Among Adults Age ≥45

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 — Rates of diabetes screening are high, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) used less but more likely to result in clinical diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Diabetes Care. Joshua M. Evron, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined changes in screening among

Interaction between immune factors triggers cancer-promoting chronic inflammation: Blocking IL-33/Treg axis prevents development of skin and colon cancer in mice with chronic inflammation

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified interaction between two elements of the immune system as critical for the transformation of a protective immune response into chronic, cancer-promoting inflammation. In their report published in PNAS, the investigators demonstrate that elevated levels of the immune factor IL-33 and regulatory T cells (Tregs), which suppress

Why children struggle with the ‘cocktail party effect’

Researchers have clarified the development of the ability to attend to a speaker in a noisy environment—a phenomenon known as the “cocktail party effect.” Published in JNeurosci, the study could have implications for helping children navigate the often-noisy surroundings in which they grow and learn. Marc Vander Ghinst and colleagues used magnetoencephalography to measure six-

Alcohol use disorder: A step toward better treatment?

A doctor diagnoses alcohol use disorder (AUD) when an individual’s use of alcohol becomes compulsive. Someone with AUD feels intense cravings for alcohol and, when none has been consumed, experiences symptoms of withdrawal. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, there are around 16 million people in the United States with AUD.

CDC: Heart attack awareness improved since 2008

(HealthDay)—Since 2008, there has been an increase in the number of U.S. adults with awareness of heart attack symptoms and knowledge of the appropriate response to a heart attack, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Jing Fang, M.D.,

Oral contraceptives could impair women’s recognition of complex emotions: Healthy women who use birth control pills are poorer judges of subtle facial expressions than non-users, according to new research

The pill could be blurring your social judgement — but perhaps not enough so you’d notice. By challenging women to identify complex emotional expressions like pride or contempt, rather than basic ones like happiness or fear, scientists have revealed subtle changes in emotion recognition associated with oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use. Published in Frontiers in

Measles Outbreak Spurs Vaccination Surge in Anti-Vaxxer Hotspot

Weeks after a hotspot for anti-vaxxers turned into a hotspot for measles infections, vaccination rates have surged in the area, according to news reports. Last month, following 50 confirmed cases and 11 suspected cases of the measles, Clark County, Washington, declared a public health emergency. Now, residents of the area are scrambling for vaccinations, according

How Kim Kardashian Really Feels About Having 4 Kids

Kim Kardashian grew up in a large family; she’s one of Robert Kardashian and Kris Jenner’s four children, and one of nine in total counting her half-siblings. And now, Kim is forming quite the brood of her own: The reality star and Kayne West are preparing for life as a family of six. But how

Postcode lottery… for seeing your doctor!

The postcode lottery of seeing your GP: Shocking map reveals the 10 areas of England where most patients are waiting over TWO weeks for an appointment More than a quarter of patients in Swindon CCG waited two weeks to see a GP  In contrast, the figure was just 7.55% in Dartford, Gravesham and Swanley CCG