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How our sense of taste changes as we age

Taste is a complex phenomenon. We do not experience the sensation through a single sense (as we would when we see something using our sense of sight, for example) but rather it is made up of the five senses working together to allow us to appreciate and enjoy food and drink. Initial visual inspection of

This Woman's Brain Tumor Symptoms Were Dismissed as Headaches

After 15 trips to the doctor for migraines, Beckie Hiley’s symptoms were still dismissed. The UK 19-year-old spent months dealing with crippling headaches that were completely hindering her from living a normal life—she couldn’t go to work or school, and she could barely keep food down. Despite her debilitating symptoms, doctors told her her pain

Eating more of this nutrient supports muscle strength as we age

If protein is the king of muscle mass food, nitrate might just be the king of muscle strength food. A new Australian study has found eating nitrate-rich vegetables like spinach, rocket and lettuce significantly improves muscle strength and physical function as we age. Power food … the nitrates in spinach, the vegetable which fuelled Popeye’s

Early intensive therapy for multiple sclerosis leads to better long-term outcomes, despite being perceived as high risk

New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes for patients, despite it often being viewed as a riskier option than other first line treatments. Dr. Emma Tallantyre, from Cardiff University’s Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, said: “Over

MANF identified as a rejuvenating factor in parabiosis

Older mice who are surgically joined with young mice in order to share a common bloodstream get stronger and healthier, making parabiosis one of the hottest topics in age research. Publishing in Nature Metabolism, researchers from the Buck Institute report that MANF (mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor) is one of the factors responsible for rejuvenating the

More accurate leukemia diagnosis expected as researchers refine leukemia classification

Like cartographers completing a map, investigators have identified multiple new subtypes of the most common childhood cancer—research that will likely improve the diagnosis and treatment of high-risk patients. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears as an advance online publication today in the journal Nature Genetics. Researchers used integrated genomic analysis,

As doctors taper or end opioid prescriptions, many patients driven to despair, suicide

Treating America’s Pain: Unintended Victims of the Opioid Crackdown, Part 1 – The Suicides The national opioid crisis propelled a crackdown on prescription painkillers, causing hundreds of doctors to abruptly reduce or completely cut off their patients’ prescriptions, leaving many among the estimated 20 million Americans who suffer from daily debilitating chronic pain to consider

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer’s journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn’t seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true

As Alzheimer’s numbers grow among Latinos, need for research grows too, say experts

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) has awarded scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and San Diego State University (SDSU) with a five-year, $4 million grant to boost the number of Latino and other underrepresented minority researchers studying Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias afflicting seniors of Latino origins, a demographic

Olfactory cells may act as ‘Trojan horse,’ carry anticancer therapy to deadly brain tumors

A special type of cell essential to the ability of olfactory neurons to regenerate may be genetically engineered to deliver anticancer therapy to the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas. In their report published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers describe using olfactory ensheathing cells to deliver an anticancer