Tag: could

New finding could unmask blood doping in athletes

A Duke University research team has found a way to help sporting officials detect whether an athlete’s blood has been doped by an infusion of their own stored blood. While tests have been developed to detect two of the three most common methods of dramatically boosting the oxygen-carrying capacity of a competitor’s blood, so-called “autologous”

New technology could help people with paralysis to speak again

Recent research led by Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, finds that the brain generates speech sounds in a similar way to how it controls hand and arm movements. The finding brings closer the day when people who are paralyzed — such as individuals with “locked-in syndrome” — will be able to speak through a “brain-machine

Early PSA testing could help predict prostate cancer among black men

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men. But black men bear a disproportionate burden of its effects. It’s more common—and more than twice as deadly—among black men compared to their white counterparts. Yet the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for prostate cancer screening do not differentiate for race,

New developments in EEG brain scans could help spot mental disorders early

Patients suffering from mental and neurological disorders, including autism, ADHD and dementia, could benefit from new developments in brain scanning technology, according to a new study published in The Neurodiagnostic Journal. Recent advances in electroencephalography (EEG) technology, which may one day be used to measure brain function throughout a patient’s lifespan, could encourage earlier diagnoses

Heart-brain connection could be predictive biomarker for epilepsy

Heartbeat irregularities connected to brain activity abnormalities may lead to the ability to predict eventual epileptic seizures in subjects who suffered physical or infectious brain insults, according to Penn State researchers who studied mouse models of cerebral malaria, which often causes epilepsy in those who survive. “We were developing, in a project led by Steven

New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries

Engineers and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3-D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function. A 3-D-printed guide, made of silicone, serves as a platform for specialized cells that are then 3-D printed on top of it. The guide

Too much sleep could be worse for health than too little

An analysis of pooled data from dozens of studies covering more than 3 million people finds that self-reported sleep duration outside of 7–8 hours each night is linked to a higher risk of death and cardiovascular diseases. The study — which scientists at Keele University in the United Kingdom led and which is now published

Quantity over quality—larger muscles could compensate for poor muscle quality in chronic kidney disease patients

The size of muscles in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be more important to maintaining good physical performance than muscle quality, new research has shown. In a paper published in the journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, researchers from the University of Leicester have found that patients with large muscles had better physical function,

Bile acids from the gut could help to treat cocaine abuse

Bile acids that aid fat digestion are also found to reduce the rewarding properties of cocaine use, according to a study publishing on July 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by India Reddy, Nicholas Smith, and Robb Flynn of Vanderbilt University, Aurelio Galli of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues. The results

How microchips could help detect prostate cancer

Professor of Electronic Engineering Andrew Flewitt is working with researchers at the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Cambridge Centre on a more accurate PSA blood test to detect prostate cancer. At present, the test has limitations for diagnosis and has to be sent off to central labs for the results, a process which can take up

Wearable, at-home patch could spot your A-fib early

(HealthDay)—The common but dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation—or a-fib—can go undetected for years. Now, research suggests a high-tech, wearable patch might spot the condition early. Use of the Zio XT wireless patch, made by iRhythm, produced “an almost threefold improvement in the rate of diagnosis of a-fib in those actively monitored compared