Tag: men

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 — Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), with the association significant for men only, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the British Journal of Cancer. Yanan Ma, from China Medical University in Shenyang, and colleagues followed 87,523 women from the

Early PSA testing could help predict prostate cancer among black men

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men. But black men bear a disproportionate burden of its effects. It’s more common—and more than twice as deadly—among black men compared to their white counterparts. Yet the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for prostate cancer screening do not differentiate for race,

HIV Infection Diagnoses on the Rise in Young Homosexual Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 — Among men who have sex with men (MSM), the change in the annual number of HIV diagnoses from 2008 to 2016 varies with age, according to research published in the Sept. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Andrew Mitsch, M.P.H.,

Mortality rate from heart failure higher in women than men

(HealthDay)—Despite decreases in overall heart failure incidence and mortality in ambulatory patients from 2009 to 2014, mortality rates remain higher in women than in men, according to a study recently published in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association. Louise Y. Sun, M.D., from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute in Canada, and colleagues

Things men secretly do but would never admit

Do you act one way in public and another in private? Whether you think your answer is yes or no, here’s the truth: we all behave differently in private than we do behind closed doors. In a study published by scientists at Newcastle University School of Psychology, researchers found that even hanging up posters with

Diet has bigger impact on emotional well-being in women than in men

Women may need a more nutrient-rich diet to support a positive emotional well-being, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. Mounting evidence suggests that anatomical and functional differences in men’s and women’s brain dictate susceptibility to mental disease. However, little is known about the role of dietary patterns in gender-specific

Dominant men make decisions faster

Hierarchies exist across all human and animal societies, organized by what behavioral scientists refer to as dominance. Dominant individuals tend to climb higher up the hierarchy ladder of their particular society, earning priority access to resources. But dominance itself depends partly on the ability to make decisions faster than others. This allows the individual to

Impotent men could find new hope… in an oxygen chamber

Impotent men could find new hope… in an oxygen chamber Research found inhaling 100% oxygen doubles incidents of erections in men  New research carried out on men with long-standing erectile dysfunction Treatment proved successful in men with no success with drug cures like Viagra Impotent men could improve their condition by having regular sessions in

Death rates from heart failure higher for women than men

Death rates from heart failure are higher for women than men, and hospitalization rates have increased in women while declining in men, found a study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). “This is the first of a series of studies to examine the sex differences in heart

Is It Harder For Women To Lose Weight Than Men?

The question: Sometimes, it feels like men can lose weight so much more easily than women can—is there any evidence to back that up? The expert: Dr Mitzi Dulan, author of The Pinterest Diet. The answer: You’re not imagining things. Frustrating as it is, there are a couple of reasons why it’s harder for women

Women Have More Active Brains Than Men, According To Science

Females have significantly more active brains than men in terms of blood flow in specific areas of the brain, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. A team at Amen Clinics in California studied 46,034 brain-imaging scans through SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), a technology used to track blood

Bisexual men have higher risk for heart disease

Bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors, finds a new study published online in the journal LGBT Health. “Our findings highlight the impact of sexual orientation, specifically sexual identity, on the cardiovascular health of men and suggest clinicians and public health practitioners should develop