Potentially inappropriate meds use prevalent in cancer patients

(HealthDay)—Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use is relatively prevalent among patients with breast or colorectal cancer, though it is not associated with most adverse outcomes, according to a study published online April 24 in Cancer. Meghan S. Karturi, M.D., from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues examined the impact of

Online reviews of plastic surgeons—study looks at differences between happy and unhappy patients

Good cosmetic results are an important factor—but not the only factor—differentiating positive versus negative reviews for plastic surgeons on Google, Yelp, and other online review sites, according to a special topic paper in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). Factors such

Protein responsible for leukemia’s aggressiveness identified

Researchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults. The identification of ubiquitin-fusion degradation 1 (UFD1) allows for better understanding what causes leukemia to progress and become highly aggressive and treatment-resistant, and may lead to a new treatment for this type of cancer.

Cycle smartly

(HealthDay)—Bicycling outdoors can feel more like fun than the high-quality aerobic activity it is. And while you may be tempted to dust off your old two-wheeler, you might want to consider a new one. Innovations include step-through bikes with a low, or no, top tube (cross bar), high-rise handlebars for better posture, wider tires for

Why free preschool makes the most sense for families

The Ontario Liberals recently announced a plan to offer free child care for preschoolers —from the age of 2.5 years until they start kindergarten —to every family that wants it by 2020. Premier Kathleen Wynne also announced Thursday funding for new licensed child-care spaces in community locations—such as community centres, places of worship and Indigenous

Hemoglobin A1c levels not tied to wound outcomes

(HealthDay)—There does not appear to be a clinically meaningful association between baseline or prospective hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and wound healing in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), according to a study published online April 16 in Diabetes Care. Betiel K. Fesseha, M.D., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues retrospectively evaluated the association between

Low-dose hyaluronidase can remove hyaluronic acid fillers

(HealthDay)—Very low doses of hyaluronidase can remove hyaluronic acid filler nodules, but more rapid resolution is seen with slightly higher doses, according to a study published online April 25 in JAMA Dermatology. Murad Alam, M.D., from Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial involving nine healthy women to examine the effectiveness

Hair Story Extends New Wash and Styling Lineups

Hair Story is about to debut its largest product expansion.The business, which garnered a following for its hair cleanser New Wash, is rolling out two new versions and several styling products in its biggest series of product launches.New Wash lives in a new category of hair cleanser, according to Hair Story chairman and chief executive

Researchers assassinate disease-causing bacteria with virus cocktail

New research from the Department of Food Science (FOOD) at the University of Copenhagen suggests that in the not-too-distant future, it might be possible to drink a cocktail of selective viruses (bacteriophages) that travel directly into the gut and kill the disease-causing bacteria without the use of antibiotics, and without harming the beneficial commensal intestinal

Blood cancer precursor found in 9/11 firefighters

A study in today’s issue of JAMA Oncology reports that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster site face an increased risk for developing myeloma precursor disease (MGUS), which can lead to the blood cancer multiple myeloma. The study was conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore

Statistical designs accelerate the optimization of layered 2-D crystals

It has been estimated that there are more than 10^100 possible materials that can be synthesised, grown, and optimised. Materials design can be a slow and laborious process and investigating the full parameter space is a formidable challenge. Machine learning and other advanced statistical techniques will almost certainly help accelerate materials discovery, design, and optimisation,