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Novel device for exploratory imaging enables about 1,000 times more access to brain tissue

Science is examining the brain’s neural activity for applications ranging from innovative therapies for brain-related injuries and disease to computational learning architectures for artificial intelligence and deep neural networks. A research team has developed a tool that lets researchers see more of a live mouse’s brain, to make discoveries that can advance research into the

Guidelines for supporting breastfeeding during maternal or child hospitalization

The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) has released its new recommendations on supporting breastfeeding during maternal or child hospitalization. Whenever possible, the lactating mother and breastfeeding infant or child should be kept together, according to the new guidelines, published in the peer-reviewed journal Breastfeeding Medicine. The ABM recommends using evidence-based guidelines for milk expression and

Risk for incident heart failure up with prepregnancy hypertension

(HealthDay)—Women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP), with or without prepregnancy hypertension, have an increased risk for incident heart failure, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association. Angela M. Malek, Ph.D., from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, and colleagues conducted a

Thai device tests for coronavirus in armpit sweat

For Bangkok market sellers, the armpit sweat soaking their T-shirts during the humid monsoon season may contain subtle signs of coronavirus infection, local scientists have said. Thai researchers are developing a sweat-based mobile virus detector, and road-tested it on shopkeepers at a Bangkok food market this week. “From the samples, we found that people infected

Kids need the COVID-19 jab for herd immunity

James Cook University scientists have developed a new model to track the COVID pandemic—and it’s telling them Australia should now prioritize delivering the Pfizer vaccine to 12-40 year-olds. Epidemiologist Professor Emma McBryde and mathematician Dr. Michael Meehan from JCU’s Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine produced the model, demonstrated in a new paper in

Early-warning system for sepsis shown to improve survival rates and cut hospital stays

Emergency room patients who were flagged by an artificial-intelligence algorithm for possibly having sepsis received antibiotics sooner and had better outcomes, according to a peer-reviewed study conducted by physician-researchers at Case Western Reserve University and MetroHealth. Their findings were published in the journal Critical Care Medicine. “We showed that when providers had access to the

Odds for an eating disorder may vary by income

(HealthDay)—Young Americans from low-income homes are more likely than those whose families are better off to be unhappy with the way they look and to have an eating disorder, a new study finds. University of Minnesota researchers examined 2010-18 data from Project EAT, a long-running study tracking the general health and well-being of teens as

New recommendations for popliteal artery aneurysms

(HealthDay)—In a clinical practice guideline issued by the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, recommendations are presented for the medical management of popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs). Alik Farber, M.D., from the Boston University School of Medicine, and colleagues developed recommendations relating to PAA screening, indications for intervention, repair

UN calls for global database of human gene editing research

The World Health Organization issued new recommendations Monday on human genome editing, calling for a global registry to track “any form of genetic manipulation” and proposing a whistle-blowing mechanism to raise concerns about unethical or unsafe research. The U.N. health agency commissioned an expert group in late 2018 following a dramatic announcement from Chinese scientist

Further hope for BCG vaccine in stemming type 1 diabetes

At the recent 2021 Annual Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) presented positive updates on their trials of the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to safely and significantly lower blood sugars. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease which currently has no cure, T cells attack the pancreas and

FDA authorizes Roche drug for severely ill COVID-19 patients

COVID vaccines and heart inflammation in young adults a ‘likely’ link: CDC panel Fox News medical contributor Dr. Janette Nesheiwat argues the condition is extremely rare and says vaccine benefits outweigh any potential side effects. The Food and Drug Administration granted emergency approval to Roche’s Actemra (tocilizumab) to boost outcomes among hospitalized COVID-19 patients receiving

ED visits for leiomyomas increased from 2006 to 2017

From 2006 to 2017, there was an increase in the number of emergency department visits for leiomyomas, but the admission rate for these visits decreased, according to a study published in the May issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Chelsea N. Fortin, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues described trends in

FETO beneficial for severe left congenital diaphragmatic hernia

(HealthDay)—Fetoscopic endoluminal tracheal occlusion (FETO) offers significant benefit for singleton fetuses with severe, but not moderate, isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia on the left side, according to two studies published online June 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis 25th International Conference on Prenatal Diagnosis and