Tag: improve

World-first tool to improve COVID-19 diagnosis, free and online

The world’s only online image-based COVID-19 diagnosis improvement tool for healthcare workers is launched today by University of Sydney spinoff DetectED-X, drawing on its global experience and outcomes in breast cancer detection and patient cases from the coronavirus pandemic. The cloud-based life-saving technology, developed by Australian-based radiation and imaging experts DetectED-X, will help doctors and

Looking for clues to improve the life of a transplanted organ

The Transplant Research Program (TxRP) at Boston Children’s Hospital is the only pediatric transplantation research program in the U.S committed to better understanding the molecular basis for organ rejection after transplantation in children. Within the last year, members of the TxRP have initiated a new initiative to extend the longevity of transplanted organs and to

Parkinson’s symptoms improve with weekly regimens of both physical and cognitive exercises

Parkinson’s patients’ motor and non-motor symptoms were improved with a weekly exercise regimen that included physical and cognitive tasks, according to new research presented today (18 December) at The Physiological Society early career conference, Future Physiology 2019: Translating Cellular Mechanisms into Lifelong Health Strategies. Parkinson’s Disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that can lead to

Artificial intelligence approaches may improve diagnostics of kidney disease

Two new studies reveal that modern machine learning—a branch of artificial intelligence in which systems learn from data, identify patterns, and make decisions—may augment traditional diagnostics of kidney disease. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of JASN. Pathologists often classify various kidney diseases on the basis of visual assessments of biopsies from patients’ kidneys;

Genetically manipulating protein level in colon cancer cells can improve chemotherapy

Colorectal cancer outcomes may improve by genetically altering an immune-regulatory protein in cancer cells, making the cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy. That’s according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings, published this month in Oncogene, indicate that increasing the expression of the PD-L1 protein in colorectal cancer cells can improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy. “These

Researchers improve classification of pancreatic cancer to better predict patient outcomes

Researchers at the University of Toronto and University Health Network have found that standard pathology grading for the most common type of pancreatic cancer can be improved to better predict patient outcomes. The research shows that conventional, histological analysis of pancreatic tumours—based in part on morphology, or shape and structure—can better predict outcomes by taking

Radiation plus chemotherapy doesn’t improve endometrial cancer recurrence-free survival

The standard of care for women with stage III/IVA endometrial cancer following surgery has been chemotherapy and radiation to prevent recurrence. But in a surprising new finding, radiation combined with chemotherapy did not increase recurrence-free survival in these women, reports a National Cancer Institute-sponsored Gynecology Oncology Group study led by a Northwestern Medicine scientist/physician. This

Why a ‘sex strike’ is unlikely to improve access to abortion

Last week the US state of Georgia passed abortion laws that wind back some of the hard-fought reproductive rights won through America’s landmark abortion case Roe v Wade. The new legislation restricts abortion once “cardiac activity” can be detected. Since this usually occurs at around six weeks of pregnancy – at which point many are

Research highlights need to improve access to healthcare for high-needs patients

University of Otago researchers have highlighted the need to improve access to primary health care services for high-needs populations with their recent study of high-needs patients using a free health clinic finding significant health problems. Elaine Gurr Professor of General Practice Tim Stokes, Research Fellow Lauralie Richard and medical student Sharmaine Sreedhar, undertook the study