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Researchers warn of COVID-19 and flu ‘twindemic’

Even as the first wave of the pandemic still roils, fears are rising of a second crush of COVID-19 infections. But because the novel coronavirus is, well, novel, no one can yet say if that will happen. One thing is certain, though, another viral wave is coming: flu season. Influenza season occurs during the cold

Private health insurers paid hospitals 247% of what Medicare would

Prices paid to hospitals nationally during 2018 by privately insured patients averaged 247% of what Medicare would have paid, with wide variation in prices among states, according to a new RAND Corporation study. Some states (Arkansas, Michigan and Rhode Island) had relative prices under 200% of Medicare, while other states (Florida, Tennessee, Alaska, West Virginia

None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk

None of the 41 most common high blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, while nine medications appeared to lower it, according to a study from Denmark, published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. Depression is common among patients with high blood pressure (also called hypertension), heart disease and stroke, and this

ADA updates guideline for pharmacotherapy of T2DM

(HealthDay)—In a 2020 American Diabetes Association clinical guideline, published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, recommendations are presented for the pharmacologic treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. Kacie Doyle-Delgado, D.N.P., from St. Mark’s Hospital and St. Mark’s Diabetes Center in Salt Lake City, and colleagues updated recommendations relating to the pharmacologic

New research reveals the suffering of temporary migrants during the COVID-19 crisis

In the early days of the COVID-19 lockdown in March, many temporary visa holders working in heavily casualised industries, such as hospitality and retail, lost their jobs and struggled to meet basic living expenses. These included international students, backpackers, graduates, sponsored workers and refugees, among others. Despite the devastating financial impact on these temporary migrants,

Frequently used serology test may not detect antibodies that could confirm protection against reinfection of COVID-19

Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while

Ina Garten Gave Another Sneak Peak of Her New Cookbook

Since May when Garten shared a recipe from her upcoming cookbook, Modern Comfort Food, we’ve been eagerly awaiting another peek. And today, as fellow Garten fan Taylor Swift‘s new album folklore played softly in the background, we stumbled upon it: another Garten recipe pulled from the pages of her highly anticipated cookbook, Fig & Cheese

Could vegetables be the fountain of youth?

(HealthDay)—If you want to live longer, you should choose beans over beef for your protein, a new analysis suggests. “These findings have important public health implications as intake of plant protein can be increased relatively easily by replacing animal protein and could have a large effect on longevity,” the researchers reported. Diets high in protein

Range of COVID-19 skin signs linked to disease severity

Skin signs of COVID-19 can range from purple toes, known as “COVID toes” seen in patients with mild infections, to a net-like rash signaling the presence of life-threatening blood clots in patients with severe disease. Certain skin changes may also be the only sign of COVID-19 infection, or may accompany or follow other COVID-19 symptoms,

Simple twist of DNA determines fate of placenta

The development of the mammalian placenta depends upon an unusual twist that separates DNA’s classic double helix into a single-stranded form, Yale researchers report July 15 in the journal Nature. The Yale team also identified the molecular regulator that acts upon this single strand to accelerate or stop placental development, a discovery with implications not