Tag: Parkinson’s

Parkinson’s symptoms improve with weekly regimens of both physical and cognitive exercises

Parkinson’s patients’ motor and non-motor symptoms were improved with a weekly exercise regimen that included physical and cognitive tasks, according to new research presented today (18 December) at The Physiological Society early career conference, Future Physiology 2019: Translating Cellular Mechanisms into Lifelong Health Strategies. Parkinson’s Disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that can lead to

A new drug target for chemically induced Parkinson’s disease

More than three decades ago, scientists discovered that a chemical found in a synthetic opioid, MPTP, induced the onset of a form of Parkinson’s disease. In a new study led by scientists from the School of Veterinary Medicine, researchers found that an enzyme in the body can metabolize compounds formed in the brain from alkaloids

Appendix removal associated with development of Parkinson’s disease: Data from 62 million records explores relationship between the gut and the nervous system disorder

Patients who had their appendix removed were more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than those whose appendix remained in place, according to the largest study to address the relationship between the two conditions. The retrospective study involving more than 62 million patient records from 26 health systems will be presented at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW)

Small Trial Provides New Hope Against Parkinson’s Disease

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 — It may be possible to restore brain cells damaged by Parkinson’s disease and reverse a patient’s condition, something no current treatment can do, according to British researchers who conducted potentially groundbreaking clinical trials. They cautioned the trial was small — just 41 patients — and the research is still in

To predict the future, the brain uses two clocks: In music, sports and other activities, we calculate movement in two different parts of the brain

That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello’s “Havana” is struck. That’s anticipatory timing. One type relies on memories from past experiences. The other on rhythm. Both are critical to our ability

Road to cell death more clearly identified for Parkinson’s disease

In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson’s disease. Results of the study, published Nov. 2 in Science, suggest promising new targets for drugs that could interrupt Parkinson’s disease progression. The study, the researchers say,

Decoding the regulation of cell survival: A major step towards preventing neurons from dying

An interdisciplinary and international research group led by Dr. Volker Busskamp from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden at the TU Dresden (CRTD) has decoded the regulatory impact on neuronal survival of a small non-coding RNA molecule, so-called miRNA, at the highest resolution to date. This deciphering of gene regulation primes applications for strengthening neurons

Woman’s bloating and clumsiness turned out to be PARKINSON’S

Diagnosed with Parkinson’s at just 35: Woman who suffered bloating and put her inability to apply eyeliner down to clumsiness turned out to have incurable nerve disease Claire Jones, now 38, has young onset Parkinson’s disease which is incurable She first noticed something was wrong when she couldn’t stop her hand shaking Now the condition

Electricity sparks neuronal diversity during brain development: Bioelectrical potential is driving force for stem cells to generate different types of neurons during embryogenesis

The cerebral cortex is a highly developed brain region, which allows intellectual functions such as conscious perception, anticipation of events and language. These functions are mediated by specific sets of neuronal circuits. To understand how these circuits emerge during development, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, in collaboration with an American team, investigated

Parkinson’s gene affects more people than previously thought

Almost 1 million people in the United States and nearly 10 million people across the world live with Parkinson’s disease. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 15 percent of those living with Parkinson’s have a hereditary form of the disease. Such hereditary forms of the condition are often down to mutations in several