Tag: Public Health

Anti-vaccine billboards appear in several states

Anti-vaccine billboards claiming that routine childhood shots are deadly have popped up in several West Virginia cities. They warn that the son of former Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter Nick Catone died from a vaccine, though the infant’s death was officially ruled to be sudden infant death syndrome. A physician director for the Cabell-Huntington Health Department,

Recent survey provides updated national estimate of doctors’ financial ties to industry

Since 2013, gifts and payments to doctors by pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been publicly reported. In addition, some medical centers, physician employers, such as Kaiser Permanente, and states have banned or restricted detailing visits, physician payments or gifts. Some manufacturers have also changed their practices for certain gifts. In order to better understand

Patient beware: Researchers diagnose crowdsourced hospital ratings

Consumers can go to Google, Yelp and Facebook for crowdsourced insight about the experiences they’ll have at a hospital, but they shouldn’t expect foolproof guidance on the quality of care they will receive, according to new Indiana University research. Researchers Victoria Perez and Seth Freedman of IU’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs compared social

Who got bit? By mailing in 16,000 ticks, citizen scientists help track disease exposures: Study offers new insight into potential exposure to tick-borne diseases

A bite from a disease-carrying tick can transmit a serious, potentially fatal infection, such as Lyme disease. But many ticks go unnoticed and unreported. Now, with the help of citizen scientists, ecologists at Colorado State University and Northern Arizona University are offering better insight into people’s and animals’ potential exposure to tick-borne diseases — not

Black Americans face education, income barriers to healthy behaviors, study finds: Policy action is needed to address income, education gap for low-income individuals, researchers say

Better educational opportunities and higher incomes may be key to closing the gap of cardiovascular health behaviors — including smoking, physical activity, and diet quality — between black and white Americans, according to a new study led by a University of Iowa researcher. The study, headed by Kara Whitaker, assistant professor in the UI’s Department

Global healthcare access and quality improved from 2000-2016

Healthcare access and quality improved globally from 2000-2016 due in part to large gains seen in many low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, according to the latest data from the Global Burden of Disease study published in The Lancet. Despite this, some countries saw progress slow or stall over this time.

Big data from world’s largest citizen science microbiome project serves food for thought: How factors such as diet, antibiotics and mental health status can influence the microbial and molecular makeup of your gut

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and collaborators have published the first major results from the American Gut Project, a crowdsourced, global citizen science effort. The project, described May 15 in mSystems, is the largest published study to date of the human microbiome — the unique microbial communities that inhabit our

Preparing for the ‘silver tsunami’: Law professor suggests how to address nation’s looming health-care and economic crisis caused by surging baby-boom population

Skyrocketing drug prices and the looming insolvency of Social Security and Medicare are just two of many pressing issues caused by America’s surging baby-boom population, often referred to as the “Silver Tsunami.” What can be done about it? In a recent article published in The Elder Law Journal, Sharona Hoffman, the Edgar A. Hahn Professor

Gun safety programs do not prevent children from handling firearms: Findings suggest that children do not retain safety skills when encountering a firearm in a real-world scenario

Children who participate in gun safety programs often ignore what they learned when encountering a real firearm, according to a Rutgers School of Nursing study. The report, published recently in Health Promotion Practice, reviewed 10 studies on the effectiveness of strategies for teaching gun safety to children ages 4 to 9. The researchers found such

Prescription drug monitoring programs may have negative unintended consequences: Study shows programs may be linked to fatal drug overdoses

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are a key component of the President’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan and considered a critical tool for reducing prescription opioid-related illness and death. The results of a study just conducted at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and University of California, Davis, show there is insufficient evidence to

The role of health in climate lawsuits

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) are at the forefront of analyzing how climate lawsuits shape the nation’s response to climate change. A new analysis investigates the role of health concerns in climate litigation since 1990 and finds that although health is cited in a minority of cases, it may have critical potential for