Tag: suggests

Research suggests new mechanism to balance emotional behavior

Research led by Si-Qiong June Liu, MD, Ph.D., Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, discovered a surprising reciprocal interaction between chemicals in the brain resulting in accelerated loss of molecules that regulate brain cell communication. The research team’s findings are published online in Nature Communications, available here.

Poverty linked to higher risk of COVID-19 death, study suggests

People in Scotland’s poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe COVID-19—and to die from the disease—than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units. The first nationwide study of its kind found patients from the most economically disadvantaged areas had a higher chance of critical care admission,

Preschoolers’ eating, activity and sleep behaviours were impacted during first COVID-19 lockdown, study suggests

Preschool children’s eating, activity, and sleep routines were disrupted during the spring COVID-19 lockdown, which may be detrimental to child health and development a study suggests. Parents of children (aged three- to five-year-old) due to start school in September 2020 shared their children’s experiences of the spring lockdown with academics from the Universities of Bristol,

Study suggests most humans are vulnerable to type 2 diabetes

Scientists have found that insulin has met an evolutionary cul-de-sac, limiting its ability to adapt to obesity and thereby rendering most people vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes. A recent study from scientists at Indiana University School of Medicine, the University of Michigan and Case Western Reserve University has determined that the sequence of insulin has

COVID-19 may have been in LA before CHRISTMAS, study suggests

Coronavirus may have been sending people in Los Angeles to ERs before Christmas and circulating in the county months earlier than the first reported case, study suggests UCLA researchers analyzed more than 10 million patient records for visits to Los  Angeles hospitals between December and February  They saw 50% increase for visits for ‘coughing’ compared

Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy

Cancer cells not only ravage the body—they also compete with each other. Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment—which also takes a toll on the patient’s body—might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect. Their paper, “Optimizing Adaptive Cancer Therapy: Dynamic Programming and Evolutionary Game

Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, study suggests

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility—the ability to adapt to changing situations. The gene, KCND2, codes for a protein that regulates potassium channels, which control electrical signals that travel along neurons. The electrical signals stimulate chemical messengers

Survey suggests elderly patients with diabetes may favor more aggressive blood sugar control

Survey results of a national sample of elderly people with type 2 diabetes suggest that many long-time patients downplay medical and social factors that underpin professional recommendations for fewer medications and less aggressive treatment of high blood sugar. The survey study, conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, concludes that many older adults with diabetes, when

Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. The study, published April 22 by Developmental Psychobiology, found that 11-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English—but not when

Study suggests how, when to support military couples after homecoming

Military couples look forward to joyful celebrations and reunions after long deployments. Difficulties may lie ahead, though, and new research with more than 500 couples in the months after homecoming suggests how and when to help. “Military couples are incredibly resilient,” says University of Illinois communication professor Leanne Knobloch, the lead author of a first-of-its-kind