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The hormone glucagon may be a warning light for diabetes

Up to one in four Danes has an unhealthy accumulation of fat in the liver, also known as fatty liver. Fatty liver is rarely the cause of symptoms in itself, but people with fatty liver have an increased risk of developing diabetes. Exactly how the two diseases are linked has, however, so far been unknown.

None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk

None of the 41 most common high blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, while nine medications appeared to lower it, according to a study from Denmark, published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. Depression is common among patients with high blood pressure (also called hypertension), heart disease and stroke, and this

A model for keeping the pandemic in check in Italy

A team of researchers has been modeling the potential spread of the coronavirus pandemic in Italy. Using their model, they can calculate the number of exposed and highly infectious individuals and the daily isolation efforts required to bring down the epidemic curve. In April, a team led by Professor Andrea Rinaldo, the head of EPFL’s

Scientists grow the first functioning mini human heart model

Michigan State University researchers have created for the first time a miniature human heart model in the laboratory, complete with all primary heart cell types and a functioning structure of chambers and vascular tissue. In the United States, heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death. “These minihearts constitute incredibly powerful models in which

Has the coronavirus mutated in any significant way?

Has the coronavirus mutated in any significant way? It doesn’t seem to have changed in a way that makes people less or more sick. There’s some evidence that a specific mutation called D614G may have made it easier for the virus to be transmitted between people. But not all scientists are convinced, and it’s hard

New research reveals the suffering of temporary migrants during the COVID-19 crisis

In the early days of the COVID-19 lockdown in March, many temporary visa holders working in heavily casualised industries, such as hospitality and retail, lost their jobs and struggled to meet basic living expenses. These included international students, backpackers, graduates, sponsored workers and refugees, among others. Despite the devastating financial impact on these temporary migrants,

The Life-Changing Impact Silence Has on Our Brains

When it comes to mental health, there are quite a number of times when silence is gold and speech silver. Indeed, contemporary life is now littered with too many noisy distractions that we seem to have accepted it as the norm in society. To truly appreciate silence, one needs to have an understanding of the

TLK protein inhibition activates the innate immune system

Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment due to their central role in DNA repair and replication. The latest work by IRB Barcelona’s Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory, led by Travis H. Stracker, concludes that TLK inhibition activates the innate immune system, a very important factor in the response to cancer.

Could vegetables be the fountain of youth?

(HealthDay)—If you want to live longer, you should choose beans over beef for your protein, a new analysis suggests. “These findings have important public health implications as intake of plant protein can be increased relatively easily by replacing animal protein and could have a large effect on longevity,” the researchers reported. Diets high in protein

The Best Gifts Pregnant People Will Actually Use

Nobody ever said being pregnant was easy. After all, you’re growing an entire human body — within your human body. You’re likely tired, maybe it’s hard to move around, and depending on how far along you are, even getting dressed can be uncomfortable at best. All kinds of weird parts of you swell during pregnancy.

Researchers identify possible immune targets in the SARS-CoV-2 genome

Otago researchers studying the COVID-19 virus (SARS-2) have discovered potential target points on its genome, which may contribute to future treatments for the virus. While their laboratory was locked down during the Level 4 period, Ph.D. student Ali Hosseini and Professor Alex McLellan from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology worked from their homes to

Unique tool paves the way for more individualized cancer treatments

Making the latest research results available to doctors increases the opportunities for finding better individualized cancer treatment. For a few years, researchers at Karolinska Insititutet and several other universities have been working on building a digital tool which will make global genomic data easily available as support for treatment decisions. The results are now published