Tag: finds

USPSTF Finds Evidence Lacking for Child HTN Screening

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2020 — The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that current evidence is inadequate for assessing the balance of benefits and harms of screening children and adolescents for high blood pressure. These findings form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the Nov. 10 issue of the Journal of

Current air pollution tied to more severe COVID-19 outcomes, study finds

Contemporaneous exposure to air pollution may influence the severity of COVID-19 illness and increase the likelihood people will die from the disease, a team of Georgia State University economists says. The team examined daily air pollution data collected from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitoring stations across the United States as well as COVID-19 mortality

Kids often hit hard by death of beloved pet, study finds

(HealthDay)—The loss of a pet may be a child’s first encounter with death, and new research suggests no one should underestimate the psychological trauma that the loss can bring. Previous studies have found that kids form deep emotional attachments to their pets and having a furry companion in your youth has been linked to greater

Pessimists die two years earlier on average, study finds

Pessimists die two years earlier than the average person – but being an optimist does not lead to a longer life, study finds Researchers compared more than 3,000 people and their scores on optimism-pessimism scales People with higher pessimistic scores were more likely to die two years earlier from issues such as cardiovascular disease Higher

Study finds weight loss surgery cost disparity

A new study from the University of Georgia finds that users of public insurance are paying more for bariatric weight loss surgery compared to private insurance patients. The study, which published recently in Clinical Obesity, is the first to break down surgeries by insurance payer type—public versus private insurance—to better understand the economic burden on

Cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, finds first study on the topic

There are 15 million cancer survivors in the United States, and prior research has provided strong evidence that lifestyle interventions, such as diet and physical activity, are especially important in the long-term recovery of cancer survivors. Energy imbalance—when energy expenditure does not equal energy intake- and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can directly affect the

Study finds our visual world of color is largely incorrect

Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. A study from Dartmouth in collaboration with Amherst College finds that people are aware of surprisingly limited color in their peripheral vision; much of our sense of a colorful visual world is likely