Tag: U.S.

Some U.S. adults unaware of any myocardial infarction symptoms

(HealthDay)—A considerable proportion of U.S. adults are unaware of some or all of the symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Dec. 18 in JAMA Network Open. Shiwani Mahajan, M.B.B.S., from Yale New Haven Health in Connecticut, and colleagues examined variation and disparities in awareness of MI symptoms among U.S. adults

ADHD rates doubled among U.S. adults over 10 years

(HealthDay)—If the latest statistics are any indication, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is no longer an issue for children only. Over a 10-year period, ADHD rates more than doubled among American adults, new research shows. However, the rate among children remains much higher than in adults. “While we can’t pinpoint the source of the increase in ADHD

Trainee demographics tied to passage of U.S. surgical boards

(HealthDay)—Resident race, ethnicity, sex, and family status at internship are associated with surgical board passage rates in the United States, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in JAMA Surgery. Heather L. Yeo, M.D., from NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, and colleagues evaluated whether trainee sociodemographic factors are associated with passage rates

Survey: many U.S. adults not planning to get flu vaccine

(HealthDay)—Many U.S. adults, including some at the highest risk for the flu and pneumonia, do not plan to get preventive vaccines, according to a survey conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago on behalf of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. The survey was conducted between Aug. 15 and 18, 2019, to better understand

More U.S. kids being diagnosed with autism, ADHD

(HealthDay)—More U.S. children today have developmental disabilities like autism and ADHD than a decade ago, though improved recognition may be a major reason, according to a government study. Researchers found that between 2009 and 2017, the percentage of U.S. children and teens with a developmental disability rose from just over 16% to nearly 18%. Increases

2007 to 2017 saw decline in number of U.S. pathologists

(HealthDay)—The U.S. pathologist workforce decreased in both absolute and population-adjusted numbers from 2007 to 2017, according to a study published online May 31 in JAMA Network Open. David M. Metter, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues used data from the American Association of Medical Colleges Center for Workforce

CDC warns not to eat romaine lettuce amid new E. coli outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumers not to eat romaine lettuce as officials investigate a new outbreak of E. coli. The outbreak has sickened at least 32 people from 11 states, including 13 who needed to be hospitalized. “CDC is advising that U.S. consumers not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers

First FDA-Approved Cannabis Drug Now Available in U.S.

THURSDAY, Nov. 1, 2018 — The first cannabis-based medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is now available by prescription nationwide. Epidiolex is a twice-daily oral solution approved for use in patients age 2 years and older with two types of epileptic syndromes, Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, CNN reported. The FDA approved

Prevalence of TBI 2.5 percent among U.S. children

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is 2.5 percent among U.S. children, and TBI is associated with several health conditions, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Pediatrics. Juliet Haarbauer-Krupa, Ph.D., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues examined the lifetime prevalence of TBI in

Total diabetes at 14 percent in U.S. adults for 2013-2016

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of diabetes was 14.0 percent among U.S. adults in 2013 to 2016, with prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes 4.3 percent, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Nicholas D. Mendola, M.P.H., from the George Washington University Milken Institute School of

Recent Increase in Contraception Use Noted Among U.S. Teenagers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 — Among U.S. adolescents, there were increases in contraceptive use from 2007 to 2014, including dual-method use and long-acting reversible contraception, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health. Laura D. Lindberg, Ph.D., from The Guttmacher Institute in New York City, and colleagues used

‘Superbugs’ Found in Vast Majority of U.S. Supermarket Meat

THURSDAY, June 28, 2018 — Nearly 80 percent of meat in U.S. supermarkets contains antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to the Environmental Working Group, a non-profit environmental research organization. The bacteria — often called “superbugs” — were resistant to at least one of 14 antibiotics tested for in 2015 by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System, a

Wildest baby naming laws in the U.S.

There are so many factors to consider when naming your newborn. SheKnows lists a whopping 20 things new parents should think about before doling out a moniker to their little one. From which spelling to choose to how compatible the child’s name will be with your own last name, there’s certainly a lot to consider. If

Wildest baby naming laws in the U.S.

There are so many factors to consider when naming your newborn. SheKnows lists a whopping 20 things new parents should think about before doling out a moniker to their little one. From which spelling to choose to how compatible the child’s name will be with your own last name, there’s certainly a lot to consider. If

Suicide ideation, attempts increasing among U.S. children

(HealthDay)—From 2008 to 2015 there was an increase in encounters for suicide ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SAs) among U.S. children, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics. Gregory Plemmons, M.D., from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues used a retrospective analysis of administrative billing data from the

U.S. heart disease rates falling, but gains vary by state

(HealthDay)—The overall rate of heart disease in the United States has declined 38 percent since 1990, a new report shows. Not every state has benefited equally, however. Between 2010 and 2016, 12 states actually saw their heart disease rates begin to creep up again, the data showed. And although the United States as a whole