Tag: kidney

Elderly patients also benefit from kidney transplantation

People in industrialized countries are getting older and are very often in good health as a result of good nutrition, a healthier lifestyle and a higher level of education. More people nowadays know how to keep fit and prevent diseases. Screening programs have increased the survival rates of many illnesses such as cancer, national vaccination

New treatment could ease the passage of kidney stones

Every year, more than half a million Americans visit the emergency room for kidney stone problems. In most cases, the stones eventually pass out of the body on their own, but the process can be excruciatingly painful. Researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital have now devised a potential treatment that could make passing kidney

Reversing polycystic kidney disease

Hereditary and relatively common, polycystic kidney disease (PKD) has long been thought to be progressive and irreversible, condemning its sufferers to a long, slow and often painful decline as fluid filled cysts develop in the kidneys, grow and eventually rob the organs of their function. Once their kidneys fail, PKD patients often require dialysis several

Artificial intelligence approaches may improve diagnostics of kidney disease

Two new studies reveal that modern machine learning—a branch of artificial intelligence in which systems learn from data, identify patterns, and make decisions—may augment traditional diagnostics of kidney disease. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of JASN. Pathologists often classify various kidney diseases on the basis of visual assessments of biopsies from patients’ kidneys;

Kidney Failure Patients Face Higher Risk of Cancer Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 14, 2019 — Patients with kidney failure who are on dialysis or have received a transplant have a sharply higher risk of dying from cancer, Australian researchers report. In fact, compared with people who don’t have kidney failure, they have more than double the odds of cancer death. The odds are particularly high

New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs

Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a “master regulator” of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. As reported in Nature Communications, a global research team led by the University of Bristol studied how the

Personalized treatment benefits kidney cancer patients

Personalized treatment plans may extend life expectancy for early-stage kidney cancer patients who have risk factors for worsening kidney disease, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology. Kidney, or renal, tumors are often discovered at an early stage and are frequently treated with partial nephrectomy, a surgical procedure in which the tumor

Team spots clue to rare lung and kidney diseases

Pulmonary-renal syndrome (PRS) refers to a group of rare but potentially fatal conditions that nearly always are caused by a misguided attack by the body’s immune system on the lungs and kidneys. Coughing up blood and blood in the urine are telltale signs. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs can be effective if begun before

Medicaid Expansion Tied to Better Kidney Disease Survival

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 — There were significant improvements in one-year survival among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) initiating dialysis following Medicaid expansion with the Affordable Care Act, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Shailender Swaminathan, Ph.D., from the Brown University School of Public

Renal-replacement timing has no effect in kidney injury, sepsis

(HealthDay)—For patients with early-stage septic shock and severe acute kidney injury, 90-day mortality does not differ for patients randomly assigned to an early strategy for initiation of renal-replacement therapy versus a delayed strategy, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Saber D. Barbar, M.D., Ph.D.,

Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease

Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. “This is the first study that has shown an important link between estrogen deprivation in younger women

Caffeine consumption may extend life expectancy for people with kidney disease

A new study in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation indicates that consuming more caffeine may help reduce the risk of death for people with chronic kidney disease. An inverse relationship between coffee consumption and mortality has been reported in the general population. However, the association between caffeine consumption and mortality for people with chronic kidney disease remains

Quantity over quality—larger muscles could compensate for poor muscle quality in chronic kidney disease patients

The size of muscles in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be more important to maintaining good physical performance than muscle quality, new research has shown. In a paper published in the journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, researchers from the University of Leicester have found that patients with large muscles had better physical function,

Children with kidney disease show blood flow changes in brain

Blood flow changes in the brains of children, adolescents and young adults with chronic kidney disease may explain why many face a higher risk of cognitive impairment, according to a study published online in the journal Radiology. Prior research has linked chronic kidney disease, a condition characterized by the loss of kidney function over time,