Tag: study

COVID-19 may have been in LA before CHRISTMAS, study suggests

Coronavirus may have been sending people in Los Angeles to ERs before Christmas and circulating in the county months earlier than the first reported case, study suggests UCLA researchers analyzed more than 10 million patient records for visits to Los  Angeles hospitals between December and February  They saw 50% increase for visits for ‘coughing’ compared

Honeybee venom destroyed breast cancer cells: Study

Fox News Flash top headlines for September 2 Venom from honeybees rapidly destroyed triple-negative breast cancer, a type of cancer that has limited treatment options, and HER2-enriched breast cancer cells, according to a study published in the journal npj Precision Oncology.  Using the venom from over 300 honeybees and bumblebees in England, Ireland and Perth,

Pessimists die two years earlier on average, study finds

Pessimists die two years earlier than the average person – but being an optimist does not lead to a longer life, study finds Researchers compared more than 3,000 people and their scores on optimism-pessimism scales People with higher pessimistic scores were more likely to die two years earlier from issues such as cardiovascular disease Higher

More COVID-19 patients in ICUs are surviving now: study

(HealthDay)—Even as new coronavirus infections soar in the United States, a new study offers one piece of good news: Severely ill COVID-19 patients are significantly more likely to survive now compared to a few months ago. In fact, deaths for COVID-19 patients in intensive care units have fallen by nearly a third in North America,

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life

Is middle age really the “golden age” when people are the most optimistic in life? Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when, as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future. “We found that

Study finds weight loss surgery cost disparity

A new study from the University of Georgia finds that users of public insurance are paying more for bariatric weight loss surgery compared to private insurance patients. The study, which published recently in Clinical Obesity, is the first to break down surgeries by insurance payer type—public versus private insurance—to better understand the economic burden on

Researchers study if nerve cells evolved to talk to microbes

Various diseases of the digestive tract, for example severe intestinal inflammation in humans, are closely linked to disturbances in the natural mobility of the intestine. What role the microbiome—i.e. the natural microbial community colonizing the digestive tract—plays in these rhythmic contractions of the intestine, also known as peristalsis, is currently the subject of intensive research.

COVID-19 study: face masks and coverings work – act now

Cloth face coverings, even homemade masks made of the correct material, are effective in reducing the spread of COVID-19—for the wearer and those around them—according to a new study from Oxford’s Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science. A comprehensive study, the report investigates the effectiveness of different face mask types and coverings, including an international comparison

Cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, finds first study on the topic

There are 15 million cancer survivors in the United States, and prior research has provided strong evidence that lifestyle interventions, such as diet and physical activity, are especially important in the long-term recovery of cancer survivors. Energy imbalance—when energy expenditure does not equal energy intake- and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can directly affect the

Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the

Study underlines importance of adequate PPE and training to prevent COVID-19 infection

Despite being at high risk of exposure to COVID-19, frontline healthcare professionals who were appropriately protected did not contract infection or develop protective immunity against the virus, finds a study from China published by The BMJ today. The researchers acknowledge that the healthcare professionals were working away from home, so had limited social interactions after