Tag: study

Researchers study if nerve cells evolved to talk to microbes

Various diseases of the digestive tract, for example severe intestinal inflammation in humans, are closely linked to disturbances in the natural mobility of the intestine. What role the microbiome—i.e. the natural microbial community colonizing the digestive tract—plays in these rhythmic contractions of the intestine, also known as peristalsis, is currently the subject of intensive research.

COVID-19 study: face masks and coverings work – act now

Cloth face coverings, even homemade masks made of the correct material, are effective in reducing the spread of COVID-19—for the wearer and those around them—according to a new study from Oxford’s Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science. A comprehensive study, the report investigates the effectiveness of different face mask types and coverings, including an international comparison

Cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, finds first study on the topic

There are 15 million cancer survivors in the United States, and prior research has provided strong evidence that lifestyle interventions, such as diet and physical activity, are especially important in the long-term recovery of cancer survivors. Energy imbalance—when energy expenditure does not equal energy intake- and metabolic changes after cancer treatment can directly affect the

Study ties blood type to COVID-19 risk; O may help, A hurt

A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were less likely. Wednesday’s report in the

Study underlines importance of adequate PPE and training to prevent COVID-19 infection

Despite being at high risk of exposure to COVID-19, frontline healthcare professionals who were appropriately protected did not contract infection or develop protective immunity against the virus, finds a study from China published by The BMJ today. The researchers acknowledge that the healthcare professionals were working away from home, so had limited social interactions after

Study finds our visual world of color is largely incorrect

Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. A study from Dartmouth in collaboration with Amherst College finds that people are aware of surprisingly limited color in their peripheral vision; much of our sense of a colorful visual world is likely

Study calls for better inclusion of same-sex attracted and gender diverse youth in sports

Western Sydney University researchers have found same-sex attracted and gender diverse (SSAGD) young people want to participate in sport, but past and current negative experiences, including those of violence and discrimination, can hold them back. The pilot study, which explored the experiences and attitudes towards sport, exercise and physical activity of 13 SSAGD young people

Hydroxychloroquine can shorten time to recovery in COVID-19: study

(HealthDay)—Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can shorten time to clinical recovery and promote pneumonia absorption among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to a study that has not yet been peer reviewed and was posted online March 31 at medRxiv.org. Zhaowei Chen, from the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University in China, and colleagues examined the efficacy of

Environmental engineers study fabrics, materials for face covers

The day before the federal government issued new recommendations that Americans wear cloth face coverings to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, a researcher at Missouri University of Science and Technology decided to test a few common household materials—pillowcases, scarves, furnace filters—”out of curiosity.” His early results, which he shared on Twitter Thursday (April

Gene mutation enhances cognitive flexibility in mice, study suggests

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered in mice what they believe is the first known genetic mutation to improve cognitive flexibility—the ability to adapt to changing situations. The gene, KCND2, codes for a protein that regulates potassium channels, which control electrical signals that travel along neurons. The electrical signals stimulate chemical messengers